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While I am new to c and want help in this program

my code is :

 #include<stdio.h>  
 #include<conio.h>  
 void main()
 {

  int suite=2;  

  switch(suite)
     {           
      case 1||2:
      printf("hi");

      case 3:
      printf("byee");

      default:
      printf("hello");
     }

  printf("I thought somebody");
  getche();
  }

I am working in turbo c and it shows no error and the output is
helloI thought somebody

Please, let me know how is this working ??? note :- here break is not the case as I intentionally left them.

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7  
You should meet my friends: Enter and Space Bar. They are really awesome and can make your code awesome too if you ask them nicely. –  Jeff Mercado Nov 5 '12 at 4:57
    
Thank you @Aniket... –  Bob Kaufman Nov 5 '12 at 4:57
    
@BobKaufman I edited only partially - part of it was never saved. Thank DaoWen as well :-) –  Aniket Nov 5 '12 at 4:58
1  
You would get much more helpful answers if you explained what you expected and why. I can think of several different ways this might not do what you expect, and it's entirely possible that you are expecting something else entirely. I'm not sure how we can explain why this doesn't do what you expect without knowing what you expect, other than by guessing right. (Are you expecting case 1||2: to act like case 3:? Or like case 1: case 2:? Or what?) –  David Schwartz Nov 5 '12 at 5:04
2  
@Er -- outside of the formatting, this was a great first question. A nice short extract, complete with the output you got from it and the mentioning of no errors. I wish everyone posted questions this good. –  Jeremy J Starcher Nov 5 '12 at 5:04
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4 Answers

case 1||2:

Becomes true. so it becomes case 1: but the passed value is 2. so default case executed. After that your printf("I thought somebody"); executed.

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2  
+1 for explaining why the OPs code did not act as he expected. –  Jeremy J Starcher Nov 5 '12 at 5:00
    
well yeah I thought it to be working like eithor 1 or 2 case .. but seems like it is working otherwise –  Er Avinash Singh Nov 5 '12 at 5:12
    
happy that u understood.... –  Jeyaram Nov 5 '12 at 5:14
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do this:

switch(suite){
  case 1:/*fall through*/
  case 2: 
    printf("Hi");
...
}

This will be a lot cleaner way to do that. The expression 1||2 evaluates to 1, since suite was 2, it will neither match 1 nor 3, and jump to default case.

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7  
They're allowed... just won't work as he might expect it. –  Jeff Mercado Nov 5 '12 at 4:57
    
@JeffMercado thanks, I might look into how they work. Man 8 years with C and something of it still comes back and schools me –  Aniket Nov 5 '12 at 4:59
    
Aniket - Since there's no boolean type in C (they're just ints) the compiler will do constant-folding on 1||2, like it would do on 0+1, and you end up with case 1 rather than the 1 or 2 that the user might expect if they're coming from a language with full pattern matching with alternates. –  DaoWen Nov 5 '12 at 5:04
1  
ah yes @DaoWen I checked with my compiler. 1||2 evaluates to 1, which is true. And... –  Aniket Nov 5 '12 at 5:05
    
@JeffMercado:- Yeah you are right. I too got the same.thanks –  Er Avinash Singh Nov 5 '12 at 5:14
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case 1||2:

Results in

case 1:

because 1 || 2 evaluates to 1 (and remember; only constant integral expressions are allowed in case statements, so you cannot check for multiple values in one case).

You want to use:

case 1:
  // fallthrough
case 2:
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1  
1||2 is a constant. The compiler would have, at some point, reduced that value down. Most likely at parse time. –  Jeremy J Starcher Nov 5 '12 at 5:07
    
@JeremyJStarcher: I didn't mean to say it wasn't (and I showed what it is reduced to in my first example), I figured that the OP wanted the same case for 1 and 2. However, reading it again, I certainly worded that in a confusing way. I'll fix it, thanks. –  Ed S. Nov 5 '12 at 21:57
    
NP. I know I like it when people tighten up my wording. –  Jeremy J Starcher Nov 5 '12 at 23:40
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You switch on value 2, which matches default case in switch statement, so it prints "hello" and then the last line prints "I thought somebody".

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