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I am using Asp.NET MVC 4 Controllers (not WebAPI) to implement a true RESTful API where a single URL needs to point to different action methods based on the HTTP Method Type.

So a URL such as mysite.com/Widget/1 could go to either of these three action methods:

[HttpPut]
public JSONResult Update(int widgetId) {}

[HttpDelete]
public JSONResult Delete(int widgetId) {}

[HttpGet]
public JSONResult Get(int widgetId) {}

What is the best way to route the one URL to these different action methods?

I came across the ActionName filter, which I could set to be the same for each action method. My RouteConfig class will then always point to the same ActionName, and MVC will pick the right action method based on the HTTP method type attribute.

[HttpPut]
[ActionName("CRUD")]
public JSONResult Update(int widgetId) {}

[HttpDelete]
[ActionName("CRUD")]
public JSONResult Delete(int widgetId) {}

[HttpGet]
[ActionName("CRUD")]
public JSONResult Get(int widgetId) {}

routes.MapRoute(
       name: "Default",
       url: "{controller}/{action}/{id}",
       defaults: new { controller = "Widget", action = "CRUD", id = UrlParameter.Optional }
        );

Is there a better way though?

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1 Answer 1

So a URL such as mysite.com/Widget/1 could go to either of these three action methods:

A call like mysite.com/Widget/1 would by default go to

[HttpGet]
public JSONResult Get(int widgetId) {}

unless you specify otherwise, if you are making an ajax call you can specify this using the TYPE attribute. For eg : TYPE:DELETE

What is the best way to route the one URL to these different action methods?

I personally dont think you need to specify [HttpPut]\Delete\Get or [ActionName("CRUD")] attributes. In your use case again by simply using the TYPE attribute all action can be effectively reached.

Examples :

To make a call to public JSONResult Update(int widgetId) {}, use

$.ajax({
    url: mysite.com/Widget/1,
    type: "UPDATE",
    success: function (result) {},
    error: function () {}
});

To make a call to public JSONResult Get(int widgetId) {}, use

$.ajax({
    url: mysite.com/Widget/1,
    type: "GET",
    success: function (result) {},
    error: function () {}
});

To make a call to public JSONResult Delete(int widgetId) {}, use

$.ajax({
    url: mysite.com/Widget/1,
    type: "DELETE",
    success: function (result) {},
    error: function () {}
});

Must Read

share|improve this answer
    
Yasser, I am not using WebAPI though, just an Asp.NET MVC 4 Web Application. As I understand, there is a difference between the two. Would your answer apply to a normal MVC 4 application too? –  user715489 Nov 5 '12 at 5:51
    
Check this video –  Yasser Nov 5 '12 at 6:00
    
Or in other words, my controller class doesnt derive from APIController but instead derives from Controller. –  user715489 Nov 5 '12 at 6:11
    
The tutorial in the video doesn't utilize HTTP methods :) He just has different action methods called Create, Delete, Get, Update. –  user715489 Nov 5 '12 at 6:18

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