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I have generic list of a custom class which has 2 properties. These properties store the raltionship between on form and another form. The list is structured as a hierachical list (parent / child ) relationship. What I want to be able to do is get a list of all forms based on a parent form reference which will be passed to a function. I am thinking the best way to go about this is with a LINQ query using a recursive approach. I am sure someone can point me in the right direction

This is the class used in the list

class FormStack    {

    #region Declares

    private Form _form;
    private Form _parent;

    #endregion

    #region Constructor

    static FormStack()
    {
    }

    #endregion

    public Form Form
    {
        get { return _form; }
        set { _form = value; }
    }

    public Form Parent
    {
        get { return _parent; }
        set { _parent = value; }
    }

}

So I would like to be able to Call a method and pass a form reference to the function and get all the children form related to this parent.

This is some of the code I have been stumbling with

// create a lookup list
var list = formStack.ToLookup( p => object.ReferenceEquals( p.Parent, parent ) );

// create a function
Func<IEnumerable<Form>, IEnumerable<Form>> recurse = null;
recurse = qs =>
{
    return
        qs
            .Concat(
                from q in qs
                from q2 in recurse( list[] )
                select q2 );
};

// filter the list
var children = recurse( list[parent] ).ToList();

I have a winform application which has standard CRUD functionality. Lets say there is a list of customers and each customer can have multiple address and each one of these addresses have multiple buildings, the way I have structured the forms is there is a list of customers, from this list you can open a detail form for a particular customer. This form has the details of the customer and all the addresses in a list. This list allows the user to now selected an address in the list and open the address details form which has a list of buildings and so on.... My problem is I want to close the customer detail and all the related forms for this customer. My idea was to keep of the relationship between the forms, but maybe I there is a better way???

share|improve this question
    
What have you tried? –  Darin Dimitrov Nov 5 '12 at 6:44
    
@DarinDimitrov just added some attempted code –  trailerman Nov 5 '12 at 6:46
1  
If formStack is just of type FormStack, I can see why that won't work - but it's not clear what you're really trying to do. It's also very unclear why you're not using automatically implemented properties, or why you've got a static constructor. Your class could be written much more simply with just two lines in the body... –  Jon Skeet Nov 5 '12 at 6:49
    
@JonSkeet Just edit the question –  trailerman Nov 5 '12 at 6:57
    
@JonSkeet Sorry typo I have just added more information to the question –  trailerman Nov 5 '12 at 6:59

2 Answers 2

Okay, it sounds to me like you have two issues. One is a syntax error (recurse(list[]) is wrong), but the other is that your FormStack isn't really a stack. It's just two forms, with no way to create a recursive chain. I think you want this:

public class FormStack : IEnumerable<Form> // or just implement SelectMany
{    
    public Form Form { get; set; }
    public FormStack Parent { get; set; }  
    //implement IEnumerable<Form> or the SelectMany method
}

Then I think you can just do this, but it seems like an awkward thing to do:

Func<FormStack, IEnumerable<Form>> recurse = qs =>
{
    return from q in qs
           select (new[] { qs.Form }).Concat(recurse(qs.Parent));
};

var list = recurse(formStack).ToList();

That's if you're insisting on the query syntax.

If I were you, though, I'd forget all that and implement an IEnumerator<Form> to do it all for you:

public class FormStack : IEnumerable<Form> 
{    
    public Form Form { get; set; }
    public FormStack Parent { get; set; }  
    public IEnumerator IEnumerable:GetEnumerator() 
    { 
        return (IEnumerator)GetEnumerator();
    }
    public IEnumerator<Form> GetEnumerator() 
    { 
        return new FormStackEnumerator(this);
    }
}
public class FormStackEnumerator : IEnumerator<Form>
{
    private FormStack _stack;
    private FormStack _first;
    public Form Current { get { return _stack.Form; } }
    object IEnumerator.Current { get { return Current; } }

    public FormStackEnumerator(FormStack stack)
    {
        _stack = stack;
        _first = stack;
    }
    public bool MoveNext()
    {
        if (_stack.Parent == null)
        {
            return false;
        }
        _stack = _stack.Parent;
        return true;
    }
    public void Reset() { _stack = _first; }
    void IDisposable.Dispose() { }
}

Then all you'd need to do in your main code is this:

var list = new List<Form>();
foreach (var node in formStack)
{
    list.Add(node.Form);
}

By the way, I just looked up the Form class (I'm not a WinForms developer) and the Forms themselves have a Parent member. So you don't really need to wrap them in a node-type construct; they're already nodes! That makes everything easy:

var list = new List<Form>();

Action<Control> recurse = target =>
{
    var form = target as Form;
    if (form != null)
    {
        list.Add(form);
        recurse(target.Parent);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I guess the word stack is probably a bad one a better word would be node. The problem I have is the drill down concept with the forms is like a tree of forms. I want to be able to close a form (node) and then close all the children forms (nodes) related to this form. –  trailerman Nov 5 '12 at 23:26
    
@trailerman - If you go with my second suggestion (the last two code blocks), you should be able to do that just fine. This is a node-type structure. A stack is just another way to picture it. If you want to iterate recursively through forms and their parents, why not just treat the first form as the top of the stack? –  Justin Morgan Nov 6 '12 at 4:44
    
I get this error with the sample code ypu showed me 'CPDPlus.App.FormStackEnumerator' does not implement interface member 'System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerator<System.Windows.Forms.Form>.Current'. 'CPDPlus.App.FormStackEnumerator.Current' cannot implement 'System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerator<System.Windows.Forms.Form>.Current' because it does not have the matching return type of 'System.Windows.Forms.Form'. –  trailerman Nov 6 '12 at 5:26
    
@trailerman - Oops. Edited. Bear in mind that if each Form has a Parent member, you can treat the forms themselves as nodes and iterate through them in the same way. –  Justin Morgan Nov 6 '12 at 15:41

here is what I made up:

Create a base Form for all your Forms:

public class MyFormBase : Form
{
    public MyFormBase()
    {
        FormRepository.RegisterForm(this);
    }

    public MyFormBase(MyFormBase parent)
        : this()
    {
        Parent = parent;
    }

    public MyFormBase Parent { get; set; }
}

Each Form can only have one Parent that is passed in the constuctor.

Create a Repository (or something simiar) to store your forms -> I do not want to store all children in the Form itself

//infrastructure - simulated with a static class
public static class FormRepository
{
    private static List<MyFormBase> _allForms = new List<MyFormBase>();

    public static void RegisterForm(MyFormBase form)
    {
        _allForms.Add(form);
    }

    public static void CloseFormAndChildren(MyFormBase form)
    {
        _allForms.Where(x => x.Parent.Equals(form)).ToList().ForEach(x => CloseFormAndChildren(x));
        form.Close();
    }
}

Call CloseFormAndChildren on any form you want to close (including the children). This could be called in the closing event...

share|improve this answer
    
The Form class already has a Parent member. –  Justin Morgan Nov 7 '12 at 5:35

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