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How many combinations needed to decode AES-256 key?

I am not very good in cryptography but I think its something like Combination 256 of 16. Its not too much.

IF use all worlds computing power what time needed for decoding?

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you were simply brute forcing every possible key, there would be 2^256 keys you need to try. You'd expect to find it after going through (on average) half of the keys, so average expected number of attempts would be 2^255. This is a Really Big Number. If every atom on earth (about 1.3 * 10^50 atoms) was a computer that could try ten billion keys a second, it would still take about 2.84 billion years. Brute-forcing is simply not possible - you'd need to find a weakness in the algorithm that lets you take a short-cut here.

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Why 2^256 ? isn't key a hexadecimal number? – pain.reign Nov 5 '12 at 7:50
    
Nope. The key is a binary blob of 256 bits. It's common to represent it as hex just because it's hard to type characters like \0, but there's nothing fundamentally hexadecimal about it. That said, even in hex, 16^16 (number of possible keys consisting of 16 hexadecimal characters) = 2^256 (number of possible keys consisting of 256 bits). – bdonlan Nov 5 '12 at 7:54
    
nice, thank you. – pain.reign Nov 5 '12 at 7:57
    
hm i calculated 2^256 = 1*e77 how can it take then 7,6e85 years? I guess we calculated something wrong. – pain.reign Nov 5 '12 at 8:02
    
Whoops, got my math wrong. Let me find a better comparison. – bdonlan Nov 5 '12 at 8:09

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