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To save the memory, I defined some record-like structs and stored their instances in arrays, as the following code shows:

struct Foo
{
    readonly char _bar;
    readonly int _baz;
    // other probable fields ...
    public char Bar{get{return _bar;}}
    public int Baz{get{return _baz;}}

    public Foo(char bar, int baz){_bar = bar; _baz = baz;}
}

static void Main ()
{
    Foo[] arr = new Foo[1000000];
    int baz;
    for(var i = 1000000; i-- > 0;){ arr[i] = new Foo('x',42); }
    for(var i = 1000000; i-- > 0;)
    { 
        baz = arr[i].Baz; //Will the Foo obj resides at arr[i] be copied?
    }
}

I know the copying won't happen if the stuff above was implemented in C/C++, yet I'm not sure about C#, what if I replace the Foo[] with an List<Foo>? C# doesn't have a mechanism to return a reference, so theoretically the indexer would return either a pointer(4 bytes) for reference type or the whole copy for value type, if the return value optimization was not involved. So, could anyone tell me, whether this sort of ridiculous copying is guaranteed to be avoided by .NET/MONO jit ?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

No, the value isn't copied - arr[i] is classified as a variable, so Baz will be fetched "in place". It took me a while to work out how you could validate that, but it is just about possible, by making the property change the value in the array...

using System;

public struct Foo
{
    private int field;

    public int Value
    {
        get
        {
            Test.array[0].field = 10;
            return field;
        }
    }
}    

public class Test
{
    public static Foo[] array = new Foo[1];

    static void Main()
    {
        Console.WriteLine(array[0].Value); // Prints 10
    }
}

Note that your comment about "the Foo obj" is somewhat misleading in C# - there isn't an object here; there's just a value of type Foo.

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Very nice validation! Thanks a lot! –  Need4Steed Nov 5 '12 at 8:05
    
@skeet But I just found out the indexer of List doesn't do the same, it returns a temporary copy. –  Need4Steed Nov 5 '12 at 8:15
    
@Need4Steed: Yes, it would have to - it's just an indexer property returning a value. Arrays have far more language support than other collections. Of course if you're using structs which are big enough for this to be a problem, you're not really using C# idiomatically to start with... –  Jon Skeet Nov 5 '12 at 8:29
 for(var i = 1000000; i-- > 0;)
    { 
        baz = arr[i].Baz; //Will the Foo obj resides at arr[i] be copied?
    }

Nope. For copy of the Foo object to occur you actually have to assign the Foo object to another variable.

Foo foo = arr[i] ;//would copy the struct at arr[i] into foo. I'm pretty sure it is this case with C/C++.
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