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This is a follow-up to my general question: bit-twiddling-find-next-power-of-two

I have now created the following template function:

template <typename T>
T nextPowerOfTwo(T n)
{
    std::size_t k=1;
    n--;
    do {
        n |= n >> k ;
        k <<=1;
    }
    while (k < sizeof(T)*8)
    return ++n;
}

2 Questions:

  1. Specifying T as unsigned in nextPowerOfTwo(unsigned T n) threw a compiler error. Can I somehow specifiy T to be unsigned?
  2. Is there something that can be honed elegance or performance-wise?

EDIT: Corrected the code, it was crap in the beginning

EDIT: Corrected the code again. I am really sorry. It was quite obvious actually. But thanks anyway for the hints. I wanted to delete it, but there were already too many contributions.

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Re #1: Not unless you're willing to list all the unsigned types. Re #2: You could implement this as a meta-function. Makes for very hard-to-beat runtime performance. :^> –  sbi Aug 25 '09 at 14:18

6 Answers 6

If you want your function to be generic, which you clearly want to, you will want to be able to use user-defined types too, which won't have the keyword unsigned. Instead, you should use std::numeric_limits to test for signedness (or, in this case, lack thereof).

You should also not use 8 * sizeof (T), but instead use numeric_limits (again) to determine how many bits your type has. :-)

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Thanks for numeric_limits!!! Another great tool in the toolbox :) –  AndreasT Aug 24 '09 at 15:15
template <typename T>
T nextPowerOfTwo(T v)
{
    if (v < 1) return 0;

    --v;
    for (int i = 0; i < sizeof v; ++i)
    	v |= v >> (1<<i);
    return v + 1;
}
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hah, thx. The amount of bits I shift is of course irrelevant. (At least on most architectures) –  AndreasT Aug 24 '09 at 14:47
    
No, I am sorry. This does not work. It does 4 shifts when it has to do 5. My example was also crap. Which makes almost all answers bogus. I am very sorry. –  AndreasT Aug 24 '09 at 14:57

To answer your first question, no, you cannot. T must be replacable with a complete type declaration; putting unsigned before T could result in unsigned unsigned int or something similar.

That's not exactly what's happening under the covers, but it's a good enough explanation for why you can't use unsigned.

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template<typename T>
T nextPowerOfTwo(T n) {
    --n;
    for(T k=1;!(k&(1<<(sizeof(n)+1));k<<=1) n|=n>>k;
    return ++n;
}
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This will reliably work only for unsigned types. –  avakar Aug 24 '09 at 15:18
    
Part of why the solution I tried to templatize above was so nice is, that I only need ld(nbits) iterations instead of nbits iterations. See the link to the original solution. This way I cannot throw k "overboard". I know I messed up when I posted the buggy code. Sorry again. –  AndreasT Aug 24 '09 at 15:20
    
avakar, yes, I was only improving the solution. And since the answer to the first question is no, there's not much we can do about it. –  Michael Krelin - hacker Aug 24 '09 at 16:24
    
AndreasT, you're right, I've been working off your code without thinking much. I've changed the code. –  Michael Krelin - hacker Aug 24 '09 at 16:30

While @hacker's version is technically correct, my Visual Studio 2008 failed to optimize it properly. Here's my version, which works perfectly. It also performs only logarithmic number of operations as per your request. Although this version is not as elegant, Visual Studio is actually able to calculate the value of nearestPowerOfTwo(value) without executing it. (You must enable optimizations of course).

template <typename T, T v>
struct value_holder
{
    static const T value = v;
};

template <typename T, typename value, typename partial_result>
struct ln_detail
{
    typedef typename ln_detail<T, value_holder<T, (value::value >> 1)>, value_holder<T, partial_result::value + 1> >::type type;
};

template <typename T, typename partial_result>
struct ln_detail<T, value_holder<T, 1>, partial_result>
{
    typedef partial_result type;
};

template <typename T, T value>
struct ln
{
    static const T value = ln_detail<T, value_holder<T, value>, value_holder<T, 0> >::type::value;
};

template <typename T>
T nearestPowerOfTwo(T v)
{
    if (v < 1) return 0;

    --v;
    for (int i = 0; i < ln<T, 8*sizeof v>::value; ++i)
    	v |= v >> (1<<i);
    return v + 1;
}
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You could improve things slightly by changing the loop test to check whether the number is one less than a power of 2:

template <typename T>
T nextPowerOfTwo(T n)
{
    std::size_t k=1;
    --n;
    do {
        n |= n >> k;
        k <<= 1;
    } while (n & (n + 1));
    return n + 1;
}

The algorithm is now O(log2(n)) rather than O(width_of_T_in_bits). This should help for small n, or if n often contains many 1 bits (though the latter doesn't appear in the improved time bound).

Of course it may actually be slower, since the loop test is now probably 2 CPU instructions vs a single instruction in yours.

EDIT 25/8/2009: Thanks to hacker for noticing a very stupid bug! Now fixed.

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2  
uh, random one,but you don't touch n in the loop, you only operate on k. Looks endless to me. –  Michael Krelin - hacker Aug 25 '09 at 7:43
    
Good spotting hacker, that was dumb! Should work now. –  j_random_hacker Aug 25 '09 at 9:57

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