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I would like to override awakeFromFetch and awakeFromInsert.

As I leave the auto-generated NSManagedObject subclasses unchanged and put my custom code in categories, my question is:

Where do I put awakeFromFetch and awakeFromInsert in order that these methods get called correctly?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If your managed object subclass files are generated by Xcode, then you can also put the methods in a category of the managed object subclass, so that the code is not overwritten when you re-generate the class files in Xcode.

MyEntity+Extensions.h

#import "MyEntity.h"

@interface MyEntity (Extensions)
@end

MyEntity+Extensions.m

#import "MyEntity+Extensions.h"

@implementation MyEntity (Extensions)

- (void)awakeFromFetch
{

} 

- (void)awakeFromInsert
{

}
@end
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Ok! I did not know that I can override methods in a customized category. –  AlexR Nov 5 '12 at 13:43
    
@AlexR: I have done it with prepareForDeletion and it worked. –  Martin R Nov 5 '12 at 13:48
    
@AlexR: See also this link: "When a category overrides an inherited method, the new version can, as usual, incorporate the inherited version through a message to super. ..." So there is no problem with overriding a inherited method of NSManagedObject in a category of MyEntity. –  Martin R Nov 5 '12 at 13:58
    
That means Core Data searches all existing categories for a NSManagedObject for a overwritten method and uses the overwritten method if it finds one? But how would Core Data prioritize the methods if there are more than one present? –  AlexR Nov 5 '12 at 13:58
1  
@AlexR: If multiple categories implement the same method, then you cannot predict which one is called, so that is definitely not a good idea. - In my code I have just one category for each managed object subclass, which contains all custom methods and overridden methods from NSManagedObject. –  Martin R Nov 5 '12 at 14:17

You might want to also consider mogenerator. It's a command-line tool which generates two classes for each of your managed objects and ensures your custom code is never overwritten when your model changes.

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Mogenerator is the bomb. –  Nicholas Hart Aug 23 '13 at 18:58

You have to implement them in your subclasses. If the code is the same for all of your subclasses and you want to avoid copy-pasting them into each of them, I would suggest to write one subclass of NSManagedObject that implements them and then make your specific entity-classes subclasses of that class.

//MyManagedObject.h
@interface MyManagedObject : NSManagedObject
//...
@end

//MyManagedObject.m
@implementation
- (void)awakeFromFetch
{
    //...
} 
- (void)awakeFromInsert
{
    //...
}
@end


//OneOfMyEntities.h
@interface OneOfMyEntities : MyManagedObject
//...
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According to NSManagedObject class reference you should put it in a subclass - calling super implementation is necessary:

Important: Subclasses must invoke super’s implementation before performing their own initialization.

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I feel making an extension is better option than subclass because in subclass you need to change the parent class again n again whenever you generate... i hope thats the better approach....

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Why must the parent class be changed in the subclass if the name of the parent class stays the same? –  AlexR Mar 14 '13 at 13:01

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