Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've been programming for quite a bit now, but I have a problem. What I am trying to do is implement a class which has the same capabilities as a built-in data type int[].

The following methods were provided for me:

public ArrayOfInt(int size); 
public int length(); 
public int get(int index); 
public void put(int index, int value);

The main method is for testing the code.

I pretty much have no idea where to start. Can somebody help me?

Edit: Here's my updated code. When I try to use d.put(0,1), I get a nullpointerexception error, which is what I'm now confused about. Shouldn't d.put(0,1) define the index and value integers?

public class ArrayofIntegers

{

private int[] arr;


public  int ArrayOfInt(int size)

{

     arr = new int[size];

    return size;

}

public int length()
{

    return arr.length;

}

public int get(int index)

{

    return arr[index];

}

public void put(int index, int value)

{

    arr[index]=value;
    System.out.print(arr[index]=value);

}

public static void main(String[] args)

{
    ArrayofIntegers d = new ArrayofIntegers();
    d.put(0,1);

}

}

share|improve this question
    
you can make use of all the methods given to you by creating an ArrayList of Integers as answered by ADAM below. –  Arham Nov 5 '12 at 10:34
1  
if you really really want to reinvent the wheel, why not use an int[] as an attribute to back your data. But I hope this is for training and not production. EDIT (looks like homework, so what have you tried?). –  jlordo Nov 5 '12 at 10:38
add comment

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you are allowed to use another int array as a backing array then this code should be enough for you:

public class ArrayOfInt{
    private final int[] array;

    public ArrayOfInt(int size) {
        array=new int[size];
    }

    public int length() {
        return array.length;
    }

    public int get(int index) {
        return array[index];
    }

    public void put(int index, int value) {
        array[index]=value;
    }

}

But one capability of built in datatype int[] will be missing from it. That is the int[] is iterable and hence the for-each loop can be applied on int[], but not above class. So to make it iterable, you have to change the above code to this:

import java.util.Iterator;

public class ArrayOfInt implements Iterable<Integer>{
    private final int[] array;

    public ArrayOfInt(int size) {
        array=new int[size];
    }

    public int length() {
        return array.length;
    }

    public int get(int index) {
        return array[index];
    }

    public void put(int index, int value) {
        array[index]=value;
    }

    @Override
    public Iterator<Integer> iterator() {
        return new Iterator() {
            private int current_index;

            @Override
            public boolean hasNext() {
                return current_index<array.length;
            }

            @Override
            public Integer next() {
                return array[current_index++];
            }

            @Override
            public void remove() {
                throw new UnsupportedOperationException("Cannot Resize Underlying Array");
            }
        };
    }
}

As you can see above, we have used Iterator<Integer> instead of Iterator<int> as int is not a reference type, but a primitive type. This will force some autoboxing and unboxing when the program runs. Hence a for-each loop over the class ArrayOfInt will not be as efficient as it is over int[].

But if you are not allowed to use int[] as an underlying array of int, then you have code the class ArrayOfInt in a much different way. First you have to decide what kind of data structure your ArrayOfInt will be.(I would prefer an balanced binary search tree, whose nodes are arranged by keys only once during the construction, where key of each node is it's index. And in that case the iterator() method of the the class ArrayOfInt will return a in-order traversal of the tree.) Then you have to write at least 2 classes for that data structure: (1) ArrayOfInt and (2) NodeOfInt. How those objects of nodes are linked & searched by index, depends on the data structure you chose. All the best.


[This part of answer has been added after asker added some more info]

change this piece of code :

public  int ArrayOfInt(int size)

{

     arr = new int[size];

    return size;

}

to this:

public ArrayOfIntegers(int size)
{
    arr = new int[size];
}

and change this line of code:

ArrayofIntegers d = new ArrayofIntegers();

to this line:

ArrayofIntegers d = new ArrayofIntegers(10); // Now your array size is fixed at 10
// For an array of size 15 , use statement: ArrayofIntegers d = new ArrayofIntegers(15);

You got a NullPointerException because; in Java, every array (be it int[] or float[][] or String[] or AnyClass[] or SomeClass[][]) is a child-class of class Object. So when a new object your class ArrayOfIntegers was created, an object named arr (inside object named d) was initialized automatically to null. Hence the statement arr[index]=value; that was trying to access arr (a null) threw NullPointerException.

[the following lines are not related to your nullpointerexception, but still i am adding them for an efficient code ]

your function public void put(int index, int value) should either be this:

public void put(int index, int value)
{
    arr[index]=value;
    System.out.print(arr[index]);
}

or this:

public void put(int index, int value)
{
    System.out.print(arr[index]=value);
}

but not this:

public void put(int index, int value)
{
    arr[index]=value;
    System.out.print(arr[index]=value);
}

It creates redundancy(repeated statements) in code.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm allowed to use int[]. I posted my updated code. I'm getting an nullpointerexception error and I'm not sure why. –  igknighton Nov 6 '12 at 1:50
    
Ok. Thanks for your help. –  igknighton Nov 7 '12 at 4:46
add comment

I think that you shouldn't reinvent the wheel since java has some built in modifiable alternatives to an array like a List. List is generic so you can create a List of Integers like this:

List<Integer> intList = new ArrayList<Integer>(); // can be ArrayList<> in java 1.7

and enjoy the benefits of the List interface. If the built-in implementations (like LinkedList and ArrayList) are not good enough for you then you can always extend the AbstractList which is provided in the Java Collections Framework.

If you need more help check out the official documentation: Java List

share|improve this answer
    
The thing is that this is a homework assignment and they want me to do it this way. –  igknighton Nov 5 '12 at 11:09
add comment

It is already available in built-in library - java.util.ArrayList which is a List implementation.
Please find the documentation.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.