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For a school project, I need to make an eavesdropping experiment between a SIP user agent and a SIP server. The experiment has to include the following steps:

  i)Establish a voice/data communication between two SIP agent.

  ii) Capture the signal (i.e. SIP packets) in wireshark.

  iii) Change the content of the signal via wireshark or some 
  other tool that fits better to this purpose.

  iv) Encrypting/securing the communication between the agents somehow 
  to avoid third parties (e.g. wireshark to eavesdrop the communication) 
   from eavesdropping.

Could you please tell me if there are tools for simulating the above scenario? I prefer to do this programmatically actually and I know there is an open source SIP stack named resip (resiprocate.org) which provides an example user agent and server already in C++. Can I simulate this scenario programmatically or it's better to use some tools that can do this?

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There are bunch of possibilities you can check/use for your project purposes.

i)Establish a voice/data communication between two SIP agent

The best way will be to use some already made solution (like e.g. some soft SIP phones).

iii) Change the content of the signal via wireshark or some other tool that fits better to this purpose.

I think that it is not possible to change traffic using wireshark at all. This is only packet sniffer so you can grab the packets without any modifications of it. You will need some tool that will be able to read and modify packets payload (look at some open source IPS code for some hints).

iv) Encrypting/securing the communication between the agents somehow
to avoid third parties (e.g. wireshark to eavesdrop the communication) from eavesdropping.

The easiest way will be to establish some tunnel (e.g. VPN) between client and server. This will encrypt and secure the communication.

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I wouldn't be surprised if there's decent libraries for secure RTP. However, if you go the secure RTP route, please use a non-variable-bandwidth codec, as using a variable-bandwidth codec allows for matching voice data without the need to decrypt the data (similar concerns for VPNs that do fixed padding). –  Vatine Nov 5 '12 at 16:16
    
@Vatine Securing RTP is one thing and securing whole communication (SIP, SDP, RTCP) is another story... –  codewarrior Nov 6 '12 at 7:58
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