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#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class Test {
    int a;
public:
    int getA() {
        return a;
    }

Test(): a(1){}
Test(int i): a(i){}

};



int main() {
    Test t1(100);
    cout << sizeof(t1) << " " << sizeof(1) << endl; // 4 4
    return 0;
}

It seems that classes in c++ have no overhead at all. t1 is of size 4 like an integer. If I add another int member to Test, it will increase its size to 8.

I would have expected something that is bigger than 4

Is it true that classes have no overhead?

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2  
What's actually the question here? –  Component 10 Nov 5 '12 at 11:17
    
no overhead thats pretty awesome –  deleted_user Nov 5 '12 at 11:17
    
Why would it have any overhead? In doesn't have any virtual functions or virtual inheritance. –  user1773602 Nov 5 '12 at 11:18
    
In general, the very concept of a class doesn't exist at runtime. –  Joseph Mansfield Nov 5 '12 at 11:18
1  
Re: "It seems that classes in c++ have no overhead at all." Indeed. C++ isn't Java. The underlying philosophy is if you don't use it you don't pay for it. –  Pete Becker Nov 5 '12 at 12:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It seems that classes in c++ have no overhead at all.

As long as a class doesn't have virtual functions, then, yes. What kind of overhead do you expect? A virtual-less class is merely a collection of variables, with a set of functions associated with the type.

class Foo {
    int a;
    int bar() const { return a*a; }
};

could be trivially replaced by

struct Foo {
    int a;
}

int Foo_bar(Foo const *that) {
    return (that->a) * (that->a);
}

If you compiled each of those snippets, you'd see, that the assembly code looks almost identitcal.


However if you add one single virtual function, the game changes dramatically.

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1  
Or a parent class (not necessarily with virtual functions). Anything that would cause the class in question need to have reference to another object (e.g. a vtable). –  peterph Nov 5 '12 at 11:23
    
@peterph: If the parent class does not have virtual functions, the increase in size was just the same as if you added a variable of the type of the parent class/struct at the top of the trivial-rewrite structure. –  datenwolf Nov 5 '12 at 11:24
    
Although your answer is correct in the narrow case. Overhead is being narrowly defined here. –  deleted_user Nov 5 '12 at 11:31

There is overhead involved if you use virtual methods or virtual inheritance.

class foo {
public:
    virtual void bar() { }
    int i;
}

takes 8 bytes per instance on 32 bit systems, 4 for the vtable pointer, and 4 for the int.

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In C++ an object cannot have zero size. That is why most compilers insert a single redundant byte into instances of classes with no data. However, if you inherit from such a class and include data, compilers can optimize the one byte away.

#include <iostream>

class Empty
{
};

class Derived : public Empty
{
    int data_;
};

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    Empty empty;
    Derived derived;
    int x;
    std::cout << sizeof(empty) << std::endl;    // 1
    std::cout << sizeof(derived) << std::endl;  // 4
    std::cout << sizeof(x) << std::endl;        // 4

    return 0;
}

This was done on gcc 4.6.3 and it is called the "Empty base optimization". There are much less subtle ways to have both data and performance overhead. Virtual functions are the most important one in most cases.

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There are some overhead, for example below sample tells something:

class Test {
    char a;
public:
    virtual int getA() {
        return a;
    }    

Test(): a('a'){}
Test(char i): a(i){}
};
  1. add virtual function to the class will add a pointer(vptr) size to class size.

  2. Alignment constraints. size of Test is 8 instead of 5. NB: I changed member a from int to char type.

Your class layout is this:

class Test  size(8):
    +---
   0    | {vfptr}
   4    | a
        | <alignment member> (size=3)
    +---

  Test::$vftable@:
    | &Test_meta
    |  0
   0    | &Test::getA

  Test::getA this adjustor: 0
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