Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a string of many zeroes and '1' but I just want the value of zeroes from the string. So, I use split function to split the '1' but it seems like it will produce the undef or empty string in the array. So, I try to scan through each array element using foreach and compare if there is empty string that i thought was "undef" will be ignored. In return, those in the not empty string will not be ignored and will be placed into another variable. The problems seem like it does not recognized my "undef" variable.

OR there is another better method to scan the string in order to pull off the number of '0' in the string?

Please help out on this matters. This the coding:

#!/usr/bin/perl

  use strict;
 use warnings;

  my $data = '111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111100000000000000011111
';

  my @values = split('1', $data);
  my $zero = "0";
foreach my $val (@values)
{
    if (!defined$val)
    {
      $zero= $val;
     }

}
  print "$zero\n";

  exit 0;

Thanks a lot.

Regards, Nicky

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

Try using tr. It transliterates all occurrences of 0 to an empty string and returns the number of changes it made. That's your number of zeroes.

my $data = '111100';
my $count = $temp =~ tr/0//;
print $count;

Take a look at this blog post for a benchmark of different approaches.

share|improve this answer
2  
You can use tr/0/0/ to avoid modifying the original string: perl -E '$d = 10101; say $d =~ tr/0/0/; say $d; output: 2, 10101 –  Dave Sherohman Nov 5 '12 at 13:37
1  
It doesn't modify the string. Use your sample line with tr/0//. You'd need tr/0//d to tell it to remove the zeros. (Zeroes?) –  Jim Davis Nov 5 '12 at 17:43
1  
@JimDavis you're right, thank you. I edited my answer. Wiktionary says both zeros and zeroes is correct. My Collins says the same, no AE/BE here, just both. ;-) –  simbabque Nov 5 '12 at 20:23
    
I tried to use tr but it seems like it got error.. –  user1799941 Nov 6 '12 at 2:28
    
@user1799941 what kind of error? Post the error message please. –  simbabque Nov 6 '12 at 8:30
my $data = '111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111100000000000000011111
';       
my @arr=$data=~/0/g;
print scalar(@arr);

Using the matching operation, all 0's can be fetched into an array, and the length of the array will give the count of zero's.

share|improve this answer
3  
You could also use the goatse-operator to shorten it: my $count =()= $data =~ m/0/g; –  simbabque Nov 5 '12 at 11:44
    
@simbabque : thanks for sharing.. –  Guru Nov 5 '12 at 11:52
    
Thanks for sharing .. this really solve the question. Glad that you help :D –  user1799941 Nov 6 '12 at 2:27

Not certain precisely what you need, but a regular expression might be useful:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

my $data = '111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111100000000000000011111';

# If you want an array of zeros

my @zeros = $data =~ /0/g;
print "@zeros\n";

# If you want the zeros together

my @multizeros = $data =~ /0+/g;
print "@multizeros\n";

Gives:

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
000000000000000
share|improve this answer

Although a regex match will probably be the most efficient way to do this, as Guru and cdarke already suggested, you can do it with split by splitting on groups of 1s instead of single 1s:

$d = 101111001;
say scalar split /1+/, $d;    # prints 3
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.