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I'm using both the magic methods _call and _callStatic for my own implementation of something like an ORM/Activerow. They're mainly meant for catching certain function calls: __call is responsible for getters and setters, and __callStatic for findBy methods (e.g. findById).

To map foreign keys, i'm trying to convert calls to e.g. getArticle to return the value of Article::findById(). To do that, i'm using this case inside my __call:

if (strstr($property, "_id")) {  
 return $foreignClass::findById($this->getId()); 
}

where $property is the substring after set or get in __call, and $foreignClass the rest of the string. So, in the case of the call getArticle, $property would be get and $foreignClass would be Article.

I've placed some echoes to ensure that the values are correct. However, my __call method gets called instead of my __callStatic. If i make an implicit static method findById, it does get called (so it does recognize it as a static call). If i specifically call Article::findById(), __call also catches it.

Is this an error with the relatively new __callStatic, or am i doing something wrong?

EDIT: The problem seems to reside in this part:

_call() is triggered when invoking inaccessible methods in an object context.
__callStatic() is triggered when invoking inaccessible methods in a static context.

Though i am calling it on a class, i am calling it from an object context. Is there a way to get into the static context in this case?

share|improve this question
    
I have dreadful feeling that there's important information missing here. In which class(es) are the magic methods defined? On which class(es) are they called? Are the classes mentioned earlier members of the same inheritance tree? If so, what is their relationship? – Jon Nov 5 '12 at 14:57
    
The inheritance tree here is DBObject(Of which i showed the code here)->Article->Activity. Article and Activity override no relevant code, all of this logic happens in DBObject. I've now changed my code to use __get and __set instead of __call, and it seems to be triggering __callStatic properly now. – Erik S Nov 5 '12 at 15:28
    
So $foreignClass is Article and the method is being invoked in the context of an Activity. That makes Article an ancestor class. There's the problem. – Jon Nov 5 '12 at 15:31
    
$foreignClass is indeed Article in this case. The variable refers to the table/object the foreign key is referring to. In this case, it's the Article that Activity is pointing to, but it might just as well be a Comment pointing to an Article (Comment is a subclass of DBObject as well). The plan was to make the only real difference in implementation here what the class is called; It uses that name to insert into the correct table. Since Article and Activity both don't override the magic methods, shouldn't they both act the same, as DBObjects? – Erik S Nov 5 '12 at 15:39
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Since the code you give runs in the context of an Activity object and since the value of $foreignClas is Article, which is an ancestor of Activity, PHP assumes that you are intending to call an ancestor's implementation of the method.

To break out of the object context there is AFAIK no option other than this absolutely hideous technique:

$id = $this->getById();
return call_user_func(
    function() use($foreignClass, $id) { 
        return call_user_func("$foreignClass::findById", $id);
    }
);
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, this is interesting. I read about it before but somehow went back to assuming that :: just called static methods. I'll look a bit further into this, but this is at least a nice source of what :: actually does do :) – Erik S Nov 5 '12 at 15:48

The __callStatic magic method was only introduced in PHP 5.3. Prior to that, I believe static calls were routed through __call just like normal method calls. My guess would be that you are using a PHP version that is < 5.3. What is the output of php -v on the command line?

share|improve this answer
    
I've just upgraded to 5.4 to be able to use __callStatic... I'll test a bit to see if it works at all. – Erik S Nov 5 '12 at 13:27
    
Edited my post. – Erik S Nov 5 '12 at 13:30

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