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Setting file permissions in Objective-C

I want to apply read/write permission for a file based on some scenario.

Is there any way to programmatically modify file permisson(read/write) in Mac OSX?

Thanks for your help in advance.

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marked as duplicate by casperOne Nov 6 '12 at 14:36

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Pragmatically or programmatically? Which language are you using? –  Alessandro Vendruscolo Nov 5 '12 at 13:07
    
I am using Objective-c. –  user123456789 Nov 5 '12 at 13:10
    

1 Answer 1

This is the snippet I use every time:

NSMutableDictionary *dict = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] init]; 

int r = 04; // read
int w = 02; // write
int x = 01; // execute

int owner = (r | w | x) * (8 * 8);
int group = (r | w)         * (8);
int other = (x);

int permissions = owner + group + other;

[dict setObject:[NSNumber numberWithInt:permissions] forKey:NSFilePosixPermissions]; 

NSError *error = nil;
[[NSFileManager defaultManager] setAttributes:dict ofItemAtPath:[file path] error:&error];

This makes the file read/write/execute-able for the owner, read/write-able for the group and executable for other.

Just adapt your permission settings…

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Style: if you're going to use octal values for r, w, and x, use 0100 and 010 instead of 8*8 and 8 too. (Though sadly, I think octal probably just confuses most people these days). –  Stephen Canon Nov 5 '12 at 13:34
    
I'm using octal numbers and then I shift them. Don't know what you mean? –  septi Nov 5 '12 at 13:42
    
I know exactly what you mean. FWIW, you don't shift them, you multiply them (which is equivalent in this case). It would be cleaner stylistically if you used octal for all of the literals instead of mixing octal and decimal. –  Stephen Canon Nov 5 '12 at 13:46
    
Ah OK, now I've got it, thanks ; ) –  septi Nov 5 '12 at 13:47

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