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After going through 2-3 hour to know, what is the difference between compile-time and run-time. Lastly, i came up with this.

Memory allocated at runtime referred to run-time/dynamic binding and allocated at compile time referred to compile-time/static binding.

and then i tried this example

class myclass {

    void here() {
        System.out.println("Here from myclass !!");
    }

    void here(int i) {
        System.out.println("Here !!" + i);
    }
}

class thisclass extends myclass {

    void here() {
        System.out.println("Here from thisclass !!");
    }
}

public class poly {

    public static void main(String s[]) {
        myclass m= new myclass();
        myclass a= new thisclass();
        m.here();
        m.here(12);
        a.here();
        a.here(13);
    }
} 

So, i also found that myclass a= new thisclass(); is considered to be run-time binding. Since, a is the object of myclass, but suddenly compiler found that, class mis-matched. So, it will be dynamically bind the space of thisclass object.

So, till here, i got the things. But, i found that, another common answer was overloading refer to compile time and overriding refer to run-time. I didn't get this point.

thisclass a= new thisclass();
a.here();

Is this also called to be run-time binding. ?? Please correct me, if wrote anything wrong here.

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1  
Is that code C++? –  Mob Nov 5 '12 at 13:10
    
Feel free to add c# or java. This isn't C++. –  Luchian Grigore Nov 5 '12 at 13:10
    
sorry for that.. it is java code –  jWeaver Nov 5 '12 at 13:11
    
Memory (which is used for the program) is never really allocated at compile-time. –  Konrad Rudolph Nov 5 '12 at 13:27
    
then why we say static binding(compile time) and dynamic binding(run-time) ?? –  jWeaver Nov 5 '12 at 13:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

First of all, memory allocation is not in this picture. There is no compile-time memory allocation.

The question conflates compile-time with static binding and run-time with dynamic binding.

Static binding happens at compile time; dynamic binding happens at runtime.

Now, when you write

myclass m= new thisclass();
m.here(18);

what happens at compile-time is the resolution of method signature: you are calling here(int) and that choice is final. This is termed "static binding". What happens at runtime is method dispatch: the runtime chooses a here(int) implementation appropriate to the runtime type of the object referenced by m. There are two methods to choose from: myclass.m(int) and thisclass.m(int), and the runtime chooses the latter in this particular example. This is termed "dynamic binding".

As to your question "is overriding compulsory for dynamic binding"... The Java Language Specification prescribes the rules on choosing the correct method to invoke at runtime. These rules imply a procedure known as "dynamic binding" for the general case. But if you are asking whether any specific process always happens at runtime, the story is different: an optimizing JIT compiler can see that there is only one method to choose from and output a direct call instruction with a fixed function address.

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ok,, so my question is.. is this a valid point to say overloading refer to compile time and overriding refer to run-time rather than overloading refer to compile time and overriding required for run-time i mean, is overriding compulsory for dynamic binding ?? –  jWeaver Nov 5 '12 at 13:38
    
This is implied by my answer. The resolution of the exact method overload to use (it is defined by its signature) happens at compile-time. The resolution of the exact method override to call happens at runtime. –  Marko Topolnik Nov 5 '12 at 13:39
    
I don't understand what you mean by "is overriding compulsory for dynamic binding". With or without method overrides, the dynamic binding is there. –  Marko Topolnik Nov 5 '12 at 13:41
    
To me, "compile time" means everything and anything that happens during compilation, and "run time" means everything and anything that happens when the code is run. There are many areas in which some decisions are made at compile time, others at run time. What is the purpose of looking for trying to attach those terms to any on type of decision? –  Patricia Shanahan Nov 5 '12 at 13:44
1  
I think we still need to clarify what exactly you mean by "dynamic binding". The Java Language Specification prescribes the rules on choosing the correct method to invoke at runtime. These rules imply a procedure known as "dynamic binding" for the general case. But if you are asking whether any specific process always happens at runtime, the story is different: an optimizing JIT compiler can see that there is only one method to choose from and output a direct call instruction with a fixed function address. –  Marko Topolnik Nov 5 '12 at 13:51

This:

thisclass a= new thisclass();
a.here();

is not run-time binding as the compiler knows what here() method to call (the one from thisclass). But if you would say:

myclass a= new thisclass();
a.here();

then would be a run-time binding.

P.S.: your classes names should start with a capital letter.

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if you go through my question, then this was my question.. but, how ??? since, i have also mentioned overloading refer to compile time and overriding refer to run-time. what about this point.?? –  jWeaver Nov 5 '12 at 13:20
    
There is a full, blow-by-blow account of method invocation, including what is done at compile time and what is done at run time, in the Java Language Specification, (docs.oracle.com/javase/specs/jls/se7/html/jls-15.html#jls-15.12) –  Patricia Shanahan Nov 5 '12 at 14:16

But, i found that, another common answer was overloading refer to compile time and overriding refer to run-time. I didn't get this point.

Overloading means having multiple methods with different parameters in the same class. Which method is called is known at compile time, because the arguments are specified at this time.

Overriding means re-defining a method from parent-class in the subclass.

share|improve this answer
    
i knew this.. but my question was.. why we say overloading refer to compile time and overriding refer to run-time.since, myclass m=new thisclass(); is the point where we say dynamic binding. is this really need overriding ?? can't we do this, when we didn't implemented the overriding concept?? –  jWeaver Nov 5 '12 at 13:35
    
It is called run-time binding since, for example, later in your code you could dynamically change the type of m with whatever subclass of myclass. Like this: m = new AnotherSubClass(). –  alan.sambol Nov 5 '12 at 13:40

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