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Can someone explain to me what this line of code means and whether it is good practice?

It seems to me that it is trying to assign one or another value to a boolean, but it is not clear.

   myBoolVar = isC || isP || isX;
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3  
This is not programming "style", it is just "programming", which you need to learn about, before wasting your own time and ours, with ridiculously elementary questions like these. –  Jonathon Reinhart Nov 5 '12 at 13:21
6  
Here, get an upvote. It’s a basic question but it’s an entirely valid one. Those downvoters need a heavy dose of caffeine and humility. –  Konrad Rudolph Nov 5 '12 at 13:21
4  
@KonradRudolph Asking whether one trivial line of code is "good practice", with no explanation of why you think it might or might not be, is a valid question?! Seriously?! Is "is i = 1; good practice?" a valid question in your opinion? –  David Schwartz Nov 5 '12 at 13:22
4  
George Boole approves of the logic of this statement. He's however quite unpleased about the identifier name choices. –  Hans Passant Nov 5 '12 at 13:25
3  
I've removed my downvote in light of the fact we appear to have a >15k user who doesn't know what this does either. –  Rawling Nov 5 '12 at 13:46

5 Answers 5

The || operator represents a conditional OR.

myBoolVar will be true if any of isC, isP, or isX is true.

It is similar to the | operator between boolean operands except that if the left-hand-side evaluates to true, the right-hand-side will not be evaluated.

As to whether it's good practise, consider a more verbose semantic equivalent:-

bool myBoolVar;

if (isC)
{
  myBoolVar = true;
}
else if (isP)
{
  myBoolVar = true;
}
else if (isX)
{
  myBoolVar = true;
}

In particular, consider which one you would prefer to maintain. For the most part, I would expect that folks consider the terser myBoolVar = isC || isP || isX; to be more readable.

I see from the comments below that you make an argument about programming being about simplicity and not about "showing off". I agree that programmers often try to compact or deliberately obfuscate code for their own satisfaction - often to the detriment of the project. This is probably not one of those cases. I might name the variables more clearly and I might encapsulate it behind an appropriately-named property, but I'd definitely use the a || b || c construction over something more verbose.

If you feel you have a clearer way to express it, share it with us and we can discuss it.

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It is worth noting that || is "logical or" while | is "binary or". They only get the same result if both operands are bool values. –  Magnus Hoff Nov 5 '12 at 13:27
2  
Why throw the bitwise OR operator into the mix? The OP obviously has barely any idea what he'd doing in the first place. Why confuse him any more? Booleans --> logical OR. Integer bitmasking --> bitwise OR. –  Jonathon Reinhart Nov 5 '12 at 13:27
1  
@MagnusHoff and Jonathon, | between boolean operands is not binary or bitwise. It is a boolean operator with full evaluation. –  Henk Holterman Nov 5 '12 at 13:33
2  
@Jonathon Reinhart: I don't mean to be rude, but a) the | operator is a logical operator as well as a bitwise one, b) the short-circuiting behaviour of the || operator is fundamental to its usage, c) if you're so angry about the OP wasting your time, why are you commenting? –  Iain Galloway Nov 5 '12 at 13:41
    
Who said I was angry? I suggested that he go read, and learn instead of wasting his own time too. I understand the short-circuit behavior of || and in my experience, I've never seen | used for "full evaluation" of boolean expressions, although I understand it works like that. I was suggesting we keep it simple for the OP who is obviously on chapter 1. –  Jonathon Reinhart Nov 5 '12 at 13:46

This is the conditional OR. The values of isC and isP and isX are OR-ed together.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/6373h346.aspx

All you need to do is Read The Fine Manual.

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3  
"Fine" Manual :-) –  Jonathon Reinhart Nov 5 '12 at 13:22
1  
Non word characters are difficult to search for - 'Your search - || - did not match any documents.' –  Colonel Panic Nov 5 '12 at 14:27
2  
I didn't say "Google it", I said "RTFM"... So if you read a proper book on C#, you learn how to use this. How come so many people just dive into programming without reading proper textbooks?? –  Roy Dictus Nov 5 '12 at 14:28

the || operator simply means OR. So in pseudocode you might say

myBoolVal = isC OR isP OR isX

What this does in plain english...

"If isC is true, or isP is true, or isX is true, then myBoolVal is true, otherwise, myBoolVal is false"

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Returns true if any of them has true value

bool myBoolVar = false;
if( isC == true || isP == true || isX == true)
{
    myBoolVar = true;
}
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4  
== true is superfluous when comparing booleans. –  Makoto Nov 5 '12 at 13:30
3  
I think he did that intentionally to make a blindingly obvious answer to a blindingly obvious question. –  Jonathon Reinhart Nov 5 '12 at 13:34
    
@JonathonReinhart you are correct, i did it intentionally to make it as clear as possible –  cichy Nov 5 '12 at 13:39
    
+1 for being abundantly clear. This is good pedagogical style. –  thisfeller Nov 5 '12 at 13:47

It is conditional OR:

It means Any of the variable from isC, isP, isX is True then myBoolVar is True

That is:

myBoolVar = if(isC == true) || if(isP == true) || if(isX == true)
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3  
I love how you use the || operator anyways in your example anyways. I would suggest breaking it into three statements. –  Richard J. Ross III Nov 5 '12 at 13:32

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