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I'm trying to apply a pseudo element to a <tr> but turns out it's not working as expected. I'm not sure if i'm missing anything or if it's just simply not possible.

Here's a jsfiddle example: http://jsfiddle.net/jDwCq/

Notice that if you change the display of tr to display: block;, the pseudo element will show up, but it is displayed as a block rather than a table, which i need.

Is it possible or am i doomed?

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exactly what are you trying to achieve with this? –  Graviton Nov 5 '12 at 13:44
    
Just trying to make a cool hover effect for the table rows. When you hover the rows, i want to make the height expand. Or i want it to look like it at least (i don't want to add padding or change height because then the siblings will be affected). I was going to use :before and :after to make it look like the top and bottom of the row becomes bigger. –  qwerty Nov 5 '12 at 13:55

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted
    tr:hover td{
      background: pink or whatever;
    }
tr:hover td:after{
  background: yellow;
}

I don't see the need for pseudo elements.

I will say that having an element, which isn't a cell, directly inside a row, is asking for pain. You could always have a pseudo-element inside every cell of a targeted row, though. With the right css, there will be no perceptible difference.

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/jDwCq/7/

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1  
I'm not sure you understand why i need pseudo elements. –  qwerty Nov 5 '12 at 15:31
    
Based on my experience of tables and css, anything you want to do with a row can be done by styling cells, and it's usually more consistent. I've added a change to your jsfiddle to my answer, to show what I mean. –  daveyfaherty Nov 5 '12 at 15:42
    
Success! I mean, i figured out it really looks like crap, and i'm probably not going to use it, but it works! Here's a fiddle with the idea i had: jsfiddle.net/LvGQD I wish i could throw in some css3 transitions for those pseudo elements, to make them slide into place, or maybe fade. –  qwerty Nov 5 '12 at 19:23
table tr:before{
position: relative; /* Needed for pseudo elem */
display: block; /*Uncomment me and see what happens*/
}

this should work...

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The only difference is you're using before instead of after.. it doesn't make any difference. –  qwerty Nov 5 '12 at 13:53

Just set display: inline-block; to TDs, and give them a width (~33% each)... and remove position: absolute from the pseudoelement.

That's it: http://jsfiddle.net/jDwCq/6/

   table tr {
        /*position: relative; /* (REALLY NOT) Needed for pseudo elem */
        display: block; /*Uncomment me and see what happens*/
    }

    td {
        width: 32.9%; /* ADD THIS */
        display: inline-block; /* AND THIS */
    }

    table tr:after {
        /*position: absolute; REMOVE THIS TOO */
        top: 0px;
        left: 0px;
        display: block;
        content: '';
        text-indent: -99999px;
        background: red;
        height: 2px;
        /*width: 100%; NOT NEEDED */
    }
share|improve this answer
    
The benifit of using display: table; is that it automatically sets the width of the column depending on the content. Sure, i could hardcode the widths, but i would very much prefer to have it display as a table. That's not possible, right? –  qwerty Nov 5 '12 at 14:10
    
Of course, but where, in your original fiddle, did u use display: table ? :) –  Andrea Ligios Nov 5 '12 at 14:22
    
Ah, i meant to say display: table-row;, and i believe that is the default for table rows (that would make sense). –  qwerty Nov 5 '12 at 14:24
    
Ah ok, it is (w3.org/TR/CSS21/sample.html), but your tr:after won't work... i can only make it work like above, hope that helps... –  Andrea Ligios Nov 5 '12 at 14:31
    
Yup, i figured. Thanks for the help! –  qwerty Nov 5 '12 at 14:44

To make the rows appear bigger using ::before and/or ::after pseudo-elements you'd have to apply those elements to the td elements, but select the td elements based on the :hover of the tr:

td::before,
td::after {
    /* defines the default states/sizes */
    height: 0;
    display: block;
    content: '';
}

tr:hover td::before,
tr:hover td::after {
    /* adjusts attributes based on the parent tr's :hover event */
    height: 1em;
}​

JS Fiddle demo.

However, if the aim is to 'look cool1' then I'd suggest adjusting the styling of the td elements themselves (since that way they can be animated), rather than using the pseudo-elements which just 'appear':

td {
    padding: 0;
    -moz-transition: padding 1s linear;
    -ms-transition: padding 1s linear;
    -o-transition: padding 1s linear;
    -webkit-transition: padding 1s linear;
    transition: padding 1s linear;
}

tr:hover td {
    padding: 1em 0;
    -moz-transition: padding 1s linear;
    -ms-transition: padding 1s linear;
    -o-transition: padding 1s linear;
    -webkit-transition: padding 1s linear;
    transition: padding 1s linear;
}

JS Fiddle demo.

Of course using this approach, you can use transition effects on color, background-color, height, font-size border (-width or -color), and adjust the timing (as well as the easing).

To animate multiple properties it's easier to use the keyword all (rather than the individual property names).


  1. Given that I'm over the age of thirty I'm having trouble defining, or even recognising, 'cool' these days; but my seven year old nephew assures me that animating the padding looks 'okay.' You may, perhaps, have to consult your own child-relatives for the coolness of alternative approaches.
share|improve this answer
    
I said specifically that i did not want to use height or padding to expand the height just because it affects the sibling rows. If you hover over one of the rows, you'll see that the ones below jumps down, which isn't very nice. The idea was to use :before for the top part of the row; just give it the same background as the row and expand the height of the :before instead of the actual row. Same thing for the bottom part, but with :after instead. This way, it looks like the row is expanding in height. –  qwerty Nov 5 '12 at 18:48
    
So explain, clearly, what you want. Because I think I'm missing something, you want the row to look like it's expanding without actually expanding? –  David Thomas Nov 5 '12 at 18:50
    
The actual row itself shouldn't be expanding, that would make the siblings jump around like in your example. What i want is to make the row expand, but instead of taking up space, just overflow it's siblings. Get it? –  qwerty Nov 5 '12 at 18:56
    
This is the final result i was looking for: jsfiddle.net/LvGQD. I must admit it doesn't look very good, and i'm probably not going to use it (for this purpose at least), but it works. Do you see the difference between your example and mine? –  qwerty Nov 5 '12 at 19:25

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