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I have been given this problem to find if a matrix of certain order is upper triangular,lower triangular or simply a diagonal matrix. I compiled the following code. It runs successfully for the upper triangular and diagonal part but the lower triangular condition is never checked.

int main()
{

    int mat[10][10];

    cout<< "\n Enter dimension of square matrix;";

    int n;

    cin>>n;

    cout<< "\n Enter the elements for the matrix :";

    for(int i=0; i< n ; i++)
        for (int j = 0; j< n ; j++)
        {
            cout<<"\n Element for positon : " << i+1 << " , " << j+1 << ":";
            cin>> mat[i][j];
        }

    int flag1=0,flg2=0,flg3=0;

    for(int i=0; i< n ; i++)
        for (int j = 0; j< n ; j++)
        {
            if(i == j)
                if(mat[i][j] == 0)
                {
                    flag1 = 1;
                    break;
                }

            if(i!= j)
            {
                if(mat[i][j]!=0)
                {
                    flag1 = 1;
                    break;
                }
                else if(mat[i]>mat[j] && mat[i][j]==0)
                {
                    flg2=flg2+1;
                }
                else (mat[i]<mat[j] && mat[i][j]==0)
                {
                    flg3=flg3+1; 
                }
            }
        }

    if(flag1== 0)
    {
        cout<< "\n A Diagonal Matrix .";
    }
    else if(flg3==3)
    {
        cout<<"\n Lower Triangular Matrix.";
    }
    else (flg2==3)
    {
        cout<<"\n Upper Triangular matrix.";
    }

    cout<<"\n\n Matrix :\n";
    for(int i=0; i< n ; i++)
    {
        for (int j = 0; j< n ; j++)
            cout<< mat[i][j] << " ";

        cout<< endl;
    }
    getch();
}

I am using a GCC compiler(Dev C++).

share|improve this question
    
(to whoever downvoted without saying why, you're being a little unhelpful) – Rook Nov 5 '12 at 13:49
    
Your "triangularity" threshold is fixed at 3. Surely this value should be dependant on n! – Rook Nov 5 '12 at 13:52
    
actually i run the test case using mat[3][3]. That's why I have kept it at 3. – log_file Nov 6 '12 at 13:11
    
Well, either supply us the test case or the general code. You're making it unnecessarily difficult for us otherwise! – Rook Nov 6 '12 at 13:20
    
i modified the code and succeeded. – log_file Nov 9 '12 at 19:08

You're comparing mat[i]>mat[j] when you probably mean i>j, the same for <.

share|improve this answer
    
mat[i]>mat[j] is a comparation between pointers, are you sure it makes sense? – linello Nov 5 '12 at 14:39

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