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Given the following code sequence:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

template <typename T>
class Base
{
    public:
        T* t;
        void b() {}
};

class D1:
        public Base<D1>
{
    public:
        int d1;
};

class D2:
        public D1
{
    public:
        int d2;
};

template <typename T>
class Selector
{
    public:

        template <typename U>
        void a(Base<U>& base)
        {
            cout << __LINE__ << endl;
            base.b();
        }

        template <typename U>
        void a(U& u)
        {
            cout << __LINE__ << endl;
        }
};


int main()
{
    D2 derivated;
    Selector<D2> s;
    s.a(derivated);
    return 0;
}

I want to check whether, some class(D2) have base (Base) , inherited any of D2 parents. I just can't get Selector to hit the most specialized member function.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can rig up your own trait to check whether a type has any Base<T> as an ancestor. The following works for me:

template <typename T> struct Foo { };

struct Bar : Foo<Bar> { };

struct Zip : Bar { };

#include <type_traits>

template <typename T>
class derives_from_any_foo
{
    typedef char yes;
    typedef char no[2];

    template <typename U>
    static yes & test(Foo<U> const &);

    static no & test(...);

public:
    static bool const value = sizeof(test(std::declval<T>())) == sizeof(yes);
};

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    std::cout << "int: " <<  derives_from_any_foo<int>::value << "\n"
              << "Bar: " <<  derives_from_any_foo<Bar>::value << "\n"
              << "Zip: " <<  derives_from_any_foo<Zip>::value << "\n";
}

There's usually no need to require any object instances for those sort of type checks; everything is just static. If you have an object, use decltype to get at its type, or add a type-deducing helper function.

share|improve this answer
    
The problem with this is that any type that is implicitly convertible to Foo<U> will also return true. That's why boost::is_base_of is so complicated. –  Xeo Nov 5 '12 at 17:44
    
@Xeo: Yeah, good point. Let's hope that Foo<U> doesn't have any implicit conversions. It's under the OP's control, after all. –  Kerrek SB Nov 5 '12 at 17:52
    
@Xeo: Actually, is std::is_base_of a library function or a compiler built-in? –  Kerrek SB Nov 5 '12 at 17:54
    
Neither. ;) The identifier std::is_base_of itself must obviously be a real class template, but how it's implemented depends on the implementation. I can only imagine it being much easier to implement using a compiler intrinsic. Also note that I was talking about the Boost version. –  Xeo Nov 5 '12 at 18:04
    
@Xeo: Yes, yes, I know. And of course there's a library stub for the std version. But I had a quick look at GCC and couldn't find any implementation body... –  Kerrek SB Nov 5 '12 at 18:42

This is happening because U = D2 is a better candidate compare to U = D1 (i.e. Base<D1>). You won't be able achieve this with the same function definition, because the first alternative always overpowers the 2nd one.

Update: If you are allowed to change class Selector, then tweak in the below SFINAE way to get it right:

template<bool> struct Bool;
template <typename T, typename = Bool<true> >
class Selector // <---- For general cases
{
public:
   template <typename U>
   void a(U& u)  // <---- choose normal funciton
   {   
     cout << __LINE__ << endl;
   }   
};
template <typename T>
class Selector<T,Bool<IsAnyPublicBaseof<T,Base>::value> >
{ // <---- For the cases like `class D2`
public:
  template <typename U>
  void a(Base<U>& base)  // <--- choose special function
  {   
    cout << __LINE__ << endl;
    base.b();
  }   
};

Where internal SFINAE is,

template<typename T, template<typename> class Base>
struct IsAnyPublicBaseOf
{
  typedef char (&yes)[2];

  template<typename X>
  static yes Check (Base<X>*);
  static char Check (...);

  static const bool value = (sizeof(Check((T*)0)) == sizeof(yes));
};

Here is a working demo with exactly your code.

Also note that, you don't need to have an object of Selector to determine. Just make the Selector::a() as static method and make the usage simple:

Selector<D2>::a(derivated);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a ton, but the other answer was a little faster than yours. Thank you. –  Dragomir Ivanov Nov 5 '12 at 15:50
    
@DragomirIvanov, both answers are at compile time so there is no point of being fast or slow :). –  iammilind Nov 6 '12 at 4:56
    
I ment...the answer was little faster, not the running time:) –  Dragomir Ivanov Nov 6 '12 at 8:57

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