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Say I have a function that expects a block:

void foo(Foo (^block)(Bar));

And say I have a function with the same signature, except not a block:

Foo myFunction(Bar);

I can do this:

foo(^(Bar bar) { return myFunction(bar); });

But I would rather do this, which would be equivalent if it worked:

foo(&myFunction);

If I try to, XCode says:

No matching function for call to 'foo'

A block is a function pointer together with some context, so on that level it seems reasonable to want to use a plain function pointer as a block with an empty context. Is it possible?

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A block is not a function pointer with context. It is a pointer to the context, which happens to contain a function pointer. –  ughoavgfhw Nov 5 '12 at 15:19
    
Even so, it seems trivial for the language to make a context with the given function pointer in it and nothing else. But I guess it's not implemented. (Maybe it would require C++-style overloading to be reasonable). Not a huge deal. –  glaebhoerl Nov 5 '12 at 15:35
    
It isn't trivial; you have to be able to pass a reference to the context into the function for the function's body to be able to retrieve said context -- to retrieve the captured variables. Overloading isn't going to help. –  bbum Nov 5 '12 at 16:09

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

A block is a function pointer together with some context, so on that level it seems reasonable to want to use a plain function pointer as a block with an empty context. Is it possible?

The problem, though, is that a block is not a function pointer together with some context.

A block captures executable code during compilation and state during execution. The executable code follows the C ABI in terms of passing arguments but, like method calls, it has some very specific requirements. Translating it to a C function declaration, a block that returns a BOOL and takes a single int argument would look like this:

BOOL blockLikeFunc(void *block, int arg) { ... }

That is, the first argument to the block's "function" must be a pointer to the block itself.

Thus, no, you can't just rip out the block's "function" pointer and cast it to/from a C function.

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Ah, that makes sense. Thank you. –  glaebhoerl Nov 7 '12 at 11:27

you submitted regular function pointers (c) stuff NOT blocks

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@import Foundation;

@implementation NSObject(extra)
+ (int)callBlock:(int (^)(int))block withArgument:(int)arg
{
    return block(arg);
}
@end;

int main() {
    @autoreleasepool {
        NSLog(@"callBlock(3) returns %d",
              [NSObject callBlock:^(int param) { return param * param; } withArgument:3]);
    } return 0;
}
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@import Foundation;

@implementation NSObject(extra)
+ (int)callFunction:(int (^)(int))function withArgument:(int)arg
{
    return function(arg);
}
@end;

int main() {
    @autoreleasepool {
        NSLog(@"doubleIt(3) returns %d", [NSObject callFunction:^(int param) { return param * param; } withArgument:3]);
    } return 0;
}
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but a block is a function pointer

Except that it isn't. If you want to pass a function pointer as an argument, try this:

int FooDouble(int x)
{
    return x * 2;
}

- (int)callFunction:(int (*)(int))function withArgument:(int)arg
{
    return function(arg);
}

NSLog(@"%d", [self callFunction:FooDouble withArgument:21]);

This outputs 42.

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"a block is a function pointer" and "a block is a function pointer together with some context" do not mean the same thing. I said the latter. And I do know how to use function pointers. Thanks. –  glaebhoerl Nov 5 '12 at 13:54
    
@illissius In this case, what is your question? –  user529758 Nov 5 '12 at 13:55

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