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I'm trying to convert some old code that directly builds SQL queries to Entity Framework, and came across a problem that many seem to have (judging from the large number of questions surround that topic): how to express dynamic where conditions in linq.

How could I express the following code with a linq query:

    switch (status) {
        case "0":
            sqlwhere = " WHERE status < 0 ";
            break;
        case "-1":
            sqlwhere = " WHERE status = -1 ";
            break;
        case "-100":
            sqlwhere = " WHERE status = -100 ";
            break;
        case "1":
        default:
            sqlwhere = " WHERE status >= 0 ";
            break;
    }

    if (strsearch != "")
        sqlwhere += " AND desc LIKE '%" + strsearch + "%' ";

    string sqlc = "SELECT top 10 * FROM c " + sqlwhere + " order by date desc";

I've read about PredicateBuilder and the dynamic Linq extensions in other posts, but I think that a simple case like could be solvable without external libraries.

Using .net 4.5, EF 5.0, C#, can this be done in a "dynamic" way without building the complete linq statement for each single case?

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1  
query = query.Where(x=>x.status<0) –  L.B Nov 5 '12 at 13:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you don't want to use something external, then simply use fluent API:

var query = db.YourTableName
              .Where(x => x.desc.Contains(strsearch));

switch (status) {
   case "0":
        query = query.Where(x => x.status < 0);
        break;
   case "-1":
        query = query.Where(x => x.status == -1);
        break;
   case "-100":
        query = query.Where(x => x.status == -100);
        break;
   case "1":
   default:
        query = query.Where(x => x.status >= 0);
        break;
}

var result = query.OrderByDescending(x => x.date)
                  .Take(10);

BTW You can create extension method for filtering by status. And your query will look like:

var query = db.YourTableName
              .FilterByStatus(status)
              .Where(x => x.desc.Contains(strsearch))
              .OrderByDescending(x => x.date)
              .Take(10);

Extension method:

public static IQueryable<YourType> FilterByStatus(this IQueryable<YourType> query, 
                                                  string status)
{

    switch (status) {
       case "0":
            return query.Where(x => x.status < 0);            
       case "-1":
            return query.Where(x => x.status == -1);
       case "-100":
            return query.Where(x => x.status == -100);
       case "1":
       default:
            return query.Where(x => x.status >= 0);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
with the fluent api syntax as above would that all be translated to ONE sql query, resulting in only one database roundtrip? it is important that all the filtering, ordering etc. will be done in the DB, as not to retrieve thousands of records and then filtering client-side. –  Tom Nov 5 '12 at 14:23
    
@Tom, yes it will be one database query, Linq will defer execution until you call to something like foreach, ToList or Count. –  Sergey Berezovskiy Nov 5 '12 at 14:30
    
thanks, that was what I was looking for. So as long as I only need to dynamically add AND where conditions (or set the ordering), I can use this instead of extensions like PredicateBuilder. –  Tom Nov 5 '12 at 14:53

In your case make use of PredicateBuilder like as below

Also check my blog post : Dynamic query with Linq

var outer = PredicateBuilder.True<Entity>();

switch (status) {
        case "0":
            outer = outer.And (p => p.status<0);
            break;
        case "-1":
            outer = outer.And (p => p.status==-1);
            break;
        case "-100":
            outer = outer.And (p => p.status==-100);
            break;
        case "1":
        default:
            outer = outer.And (p => p.status>=0); 
            break;
    }

if (strsearch != "")
        outer = outer.And (p => p.desc.Contains(strsearch ));

dataContext.Entity.Where (outer );
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the answer and link -- while this is more powerful, I was looking for a solution without "extenions". –  Tom Nov 5 '12 at 14:55

you can use LinkExtension with LinqKit

  using (var context = new workEntities() )
{

    Dictionary<string, List<string>> dictionary = new Dictionary<string, List<string>>();
    dictionary["Title"] = new List<string> {  
                    "Network Engineer", 
                    "Security Specialist", 
                    "=Web Developer"
                };
    dictionary["Salary"] = new List<string> { ">=2000" };
    dictionary["VacationHours"] = new List<string> { ">21" };
    dictionary["SickLeaveHours"] = new List<string> { "<5" };                
    dictionary["HireDate"] = new List<string> { 
                    ">=01/01/2000",
                    "28/02/2014" 
                };
    dictionary["ModifiedDate"] = new List<string> { DateTime.Now.ToString() };

    var data = context.Employee.CollectionToQuery(dictionary).ToList();
}
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