Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following structure

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
public struct SFHeader
{

    [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.ByValTStr, SizeConst = 5)]
    public string FileName;

    public int Offset;

    public short Size;

    public byte Flags;

    public byte Source;


    public long LastWriteTime;


    public byte[] GetBytes()
    {
        int size = Marshal.SizeOf(this);
        var buffer = new byte[size];
        IntPtr ptr = Marshal.AllocHGlobal(size);

        Marshal.StructureToPtr(this, ptr, true);
        Marshal.Copy(ptr, buffer, 0, size);
        Marshal.FreeHGlobal(ptr);

        return buffer;
    }


    public static SFHeader FromBytes(byte[] buffer)
    {
        var str = new SFHeader();
        int size = Marshal.SizeOf(str);

        IntPtr ptr = Marshal.AllocHGlobal(size);
        Marshal.Copy(buffer, 0, ptr, size);
        str = (SFHeader)Marshal.PtrToStructure(ptr, str.GetType());
        Marshal.FreeHGlobal(ptr);

        return str;
    }

}

I need to convert my structure to an array of byte (to send as packet with socket), so I use the GetBytes method, but it returns an array of 24 bytes instead of an array of 21 bytes:

  • Filename (string): 5 bytes
  • Offset (int): 4 bytes
  • Size (short): 2 bytes
  • Flags (byte): 1 byte
  • Source (byte): 1 byte
  • LastWriteTime (long): 8 bytes

So: 5+4+2+1+1+8 = 21 bytes.
This happens because Marshal.SizeOf returns 24, why? And it seems that the the bytes in excess are placed after the bytes of the string, in fact for example the following structure:

var header = new SFHeader()
{
   FileName = "aaaa",
   Offset = 1,
   Size = 1
};

is converted to the following buffer:

[0] = 97
[1] = 97
[2] = 97
[3] = 97
[4] = 0
[5] = 0
[6] = 0
[7] = 0
[8] = 1
[9] = 0
[10] = 0
[11] = 0
[12] = 1
[13] = 0
... The following are all zero (0)

The fifth, sixth and seventh are the bytes in excess. How can I solve this problem?

share|improve this question
    
The string has a weird length, so the other fields got realigned. Using Explicit Layout may fix that. "Sequential" does not mean "contiguous". –  harold Nov 5 '12 at 14:20
    
Does the string always has the same length? –  SynerCoder Nov 5 '12 at 14:26
    
@SynerCoder yes, a maximum of 5 bytes. –  Nick Nov 5 '12 at 14:28
    
Then instead of a string might I suggest char[5] –  SynerCoder Nov 5 '12 at 14:29
    
@harold If i try I get a System.TypeLoadException. –  Nick Nov 5 '12 at 14:29
show 3 more comments

2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You're running into a byte-alignment issue. In an attempt to keep fields on word boundaries for speed of access, the compiler is padding your string with 3 extra bytes. To fix this, use the Pack field of the StructLayoutAttribute.

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential, Pack=1)]  // notice the packing here
public struct SFHeader
{
    [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.ByValTStr, SizeConst = 5)]
    public string FileName;

    public int Offset;

    public short Size;

    public byte Flags;

    public byte Source;

    public long LastWriteTime;
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's right. It works perfectly. Thanks. –  Nick Nov 5 '12 at 14:34
add comment

You could use a fixed size buffer instead of a string.

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
public unsafe struct SFHeader
{
    public fixed char FileName[5];
    public int Offset;
    public short Size;
    public byte Flags;
    public byte Source;
    public long LastWriteTime;

    public byte[] GetBytes()
    {
        //omitted
    }

    public static SFHeader FromBytes(byte[] buffer)
    {
        //omitted
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Well that is akward, question already answered... –  SynerCoder Nov 5 '12 at 14:37
2  
That gives a size of 32, not 21. Even if you replace char with byte, you still get 24 from the Marshal.SizeOf() call. –  Matt Davis Nov 5 '12 at 15:31
    
@MattDavis in my defence I never worked much with structs :p –  SynerCoder Nov 5 '12 at 15:44
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.