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Is there any way I can get a list of all the running Threads in the current JVM (including the Threads NOT started by my class)?

Is it also possible to get the Thread and Class objects of all Thread in the list?

I want to be able to do this through code.

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9 Answers 9

up vote 133 down vote accepted

To get an iterable set:

Set<Thread> threadSet = Thread.getAllStackTraces().keySet();

To convert it to an array:

Thread[] threadArray = threadSet.toArray(new Thread[threadSet.size()]);
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7  
While much cleaner than the other alternative proposed, this has the downside of incurring the cost of getting stack traces for all threads. If you will be using those stack traces anyway, this is clearly superior. If not, then this may be significantly slower for no gain other than clean code. –  Eddie Sep 3 '11 at 2:56
18  
@Eddie Is that an assumption from common sense, or did you do experiments? "significantly slower" you say; how much slower? Is it worth it? I question any attempt to make code worse for the sake of efficiency. If you have an efficiency requirement and an infrastructure to measure efficiency quantitatively, then I'm ok with people making code worse, because they seem to know what they're doing. See the root of all evil according to Donald Knuth. –  thejoshwolfe Sep 3 '11 at 5:08
12  
I haven't timed these specific alternatives, but I've worked with other Java means of gathering stack traces vs just a list of threads. The performance impact seems to depend very strongly on which JVM you are using (JRockit vs Sun JVM for example). It's worth measuring in your specific instance. Whether or not it will affect you depends on your JVM choice and on how many threads you have. I found that getting all stack traces via ThreadMXBean.dumpAllThreads for about 250 threads to take 150 - 200 msec while getting just the list of threads (without traces) to not be measurable (0 msec). –  Eddie Sep 8 '11 at 15:55

Get a handle to the root ThreadGroup, like this:

ThreadGroup rootGroup = Thread.currentThread( ).getThreadGroup( );
ThreadGroup parentGroup;
while ( ( parentGroup = rootGroup.getParent() ) != null ) {
    rootGroup = parentGroup;
}

Now, call the enumerate() function on the root group repeatedly. The second argument lets you get all threads, recursively:

Thread[] threads = new Thread[ rootGroup.activeCount() ];
while ( rootGroup.enumerate( threads, true ) == threads.length ) {
    threads = new Thread[ threads.length * 2 ];
}

Note how we call enumerate() repeatedly until the array is large enough to contain all entries.

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13  
I'm shocked that this strategy is so popular on the internet. My strategy is way simpler (1 line of code) and works just as well with the added bonus of avoiding race conditions. –  thejoshwolfe Aug 15 '11 at 5:49
3  
@thejoshwolfe: Actually, I agree - I think your answer is much better, and it probably would've been the accepted answer in the first place if it wouldn't have been one year late. If the OP still frequents SO, which he apparently does, he'd be well advised to un-accept my answer and rather accept yours. –  Frerich Raabe Oct 23 '12 at 21:16
1  
@thejoshwolfe your resulotion wont work with java 1.4 –  fnobbi Jun 24 '13 at 6:17
1  
Note that for anything other than the rootGroup, you should use new Thread[rootGroup.activeCount()+1]. activeCount() could be zero, and if it is you will run into an infinite loop. –  jmiserez Jul 31 at 22:55
    
@thejoshwolfe I suppose this solution is much less expensive. –  Haozhun Aug 22 at 23:40

Yes, take a look at getting a list of threads. Lots of examples on that page.

That's to do it programmatically. If you just want a list on Linux at least you can just use this command:

kill -3 processid

and the VM will do a thread dump to stdout.

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3  
kill -3? At least on my linux, that's "terminal quit". Kills, does not list. –  khedron Aug 24 '09 at 16:45
2  
cletus is indeed correct - a kill -3 will thread dump to stdout, regardless of what the signal is supposed to mean. I would consider using jstack instead. –  brainzzy Apr 6 at 10:00

You can get a lot of information about threads from the ThreadMXBean.

Call the static ManagementFactory.getThreadMXBean() method to get a reference to the MBean.

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I like this. It seems the cleanest and most 'API-supported' method –  Brian Agnew Jun 25 at 11:22

Have you taken a look at jconsole?

This will list all threads running for a particular Java process.

You can start jconsole from the JDK bin folder.

You can also get a full stack trace for all threads by hitting Ctrl+Break in Windows or by sending kill pid --QUIT in Linux.

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I want to access the list within my java class –  Kryten Aug 24 '09 at 16:32
    
In which case look at cletus' answer. –  pjp Aug 24 '09 at 16:33
1  
Um, why are people voting this up when the guy said he wanted a programmatic solution? –  cletus Aug 24 '09 at 16:51
    
Because the question doesn't state that. I'll edit the question to make it explicit. –  pjp Aug 24 '09 at 17:05

In Groovy you can call private methods

// Get a snapshot of the list of all threads 
Thread[] threads = Thread.getThreads()
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In the java console, hit Ctrl-Break. It will list all threads plus some information about the heap. This won't give you access to the objects of course. But it can be very helpful for debugging anyway.

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    public static void main(String[] args) {


    	// Walk up all the way to the root thread group
        ThreadGroup rootGroup = Thread.currentThread().getThreadGroup();
        ThreadGroup parent;
        while ((parent = rootGroup.getParent()) != null) {
            rootGroup = parent;
        }

        listThreads(rootGroup, "");
    }


    // List all threads and recursively list all subgroup
    public static void listThreads(ThreadGroup group, String indent) {
        System.out.println(indent + "Group[" + group.getName() + 
        		":" + group.getClass()+"]");
        int nt = group.activeCount();
        Thread[] threads = new Thread[nt*2 + 10]; //nt is not accurate
        nt = group.enumerate(threads, false);

        // List every thread in the group
        for (int i=0; i<nt; i++) {
            Thread t = threads[i];
            System.out.println(indent + "  Thread[" + t.getName() 
            		+ ":" + t.getClass() + "]");
        }

        // Recursively list all subgroups
        int ng = group.activeGroupCount();
        ThreadGroup[] groups = new ThreadGroup[ng*2 + 10];
        ng = group.enumerate(groups, false);

        for (int i=0; i<ng; i++) {
            listThreads(groups[i], indent + "  ");
        }
    }
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package com.nisarg.threads;


public class CurrentlyActiveThreads {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        ThreadGroup threadGroup = Thread.currentThread().getThreadGroup();
        ThreadGroup parent;
        while((parent = threadGroup.getParent()) != null) {
            if(null != threadGroup) {
                threadGroup = parent;
                if(null != threadGroup) {
                    Thread [] threadList = new Thread[threadGroup.activeCount()];
                    threadGroup.enumerate(threadList);
                    for (Thread thread : threadList)
                        System.out.println(new StringBuilder().append(thread.getThreadGroup().getName())
                                .append("::").append(thread.getName()).append("::PRIORITY:-")
                                .append(thread.getPriority()));
                }
            }
        }
    }
}
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1  
This is not the solution that the user is looking for. He needs an array of thread. The second answer does an elegant job. This just prints on the console which is not required by the user. –  dhilipsiva Dec 28 '12 at 6:39
    
-1: threadGroup.activeCount() is not guaranteed to be exact, it is just an approximate value. Threads will be missing if you use this. –  jmiserez Jul 31 at 22:58

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