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I have declared NSString with some string value in ViewdidLoad like..

int i=1;
strval=[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%03d",i];
strval=[NSString stringWithFormat:@"S%@",strval];

NSLog(@"Value %@",strval);

it gives correct result as S001, but when i print this same in IBAction like,

- (IBAction)stringvalue:(id)sender {
NSLog(@"Value %@",strval);
}

it gives unknown values each time.Sometimes it throws EXEC_BAD_ACCESS error.

Please help me..

share|improve this question
    
stringValue method doesn't know about strval. Where are you declaring strval? And How? –  Popeye Nov 5 '12 at 14:38
    
I have declared in header file using property attribute and i have synthesize it in implementation file, stringvalue is just my button click action.. –  Harish Saran Nov 5 '12 at 14:40
    
Update your code please so we can see it all. the .h part, your synthesize. –  Popeye Nov 5 '12 at 14:41
    
You don't ARC, right? Anyway, it is advisable to access properties though the setter only (unless in a getter or setter itself). Use self.strval = ... –  Hermann Klecker Nov 5 '12 at 14:42
    
In header file i declared as //@property (retain, nonatomic) NSString *strval; In Implementation file I declared as //@synthesize strval; –  Harish Saran Nov 5 '12 at 14:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Looks like you aren't using ARC, so the string is being released the next time the autorelease pool drains. You need to explicitly retain it in viewDidLoad and explicitly release it in your overwridden dealloc method:

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
    ...

    strval = [[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%03d", i] retain];

    ....
}

- (void)dealloc
{
    [strval release];

    ...

    [super dealloc];
}

(I am assuming you've actually declared strval as an instance method).

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+1 for good answer of none ARC –  Popeye Nov 5 '12 at 14:49
2  
Thanks Its Working trojanfoe...upvoted –  Harish Saran Nov 5 '12 at 14:58
    
Actually slightly better would be strval = [[NSString alloc] initWithFormat:@"%03d", i];. –  trojanfoe Jan 14 '13 at 10:11

Try something like this

in .h

  @property (nonatomic, strong) NSString *strval;

in .m

  @synthesize strval = _strval

  - (void)viewDidLoad 
  {
      int i = 4;
      // ARC
      _strval = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"hello %d", i];
      // None ARC
      // strcal = [[NSString alloc] initwithFormat:@"hello %d",i];
      NSLog(@"%@", _strval);
      // Prints "hello 4" in console (TESTED)
  } 

  - (IBAction)buttonPress:(id)sender
  {
      NSLog(@"%@", _strval);
      // Prints "hello 4" in console (TESTED)
  }

using ARC. This has been tested and works the way the question has been asked.

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+1 cos I like you. –  trojanfoe Nov 5 '12 at 14:51
    
@trojanfoe thanks. –  Popeye Nov 5 '12 at 14:52
1  
Popeye thanks..upvoted.. –  Harish Saran Nov 5 '12 at 15:03

in .h

  @property (nonatomic, strong) NSString *strval;

in .m

  @synthesize strval = _strval   

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
    ...

    self.strval = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%03d", i];

    ....
}

- (void)dealloc
{
    self.strval = nil;

    ...

    [super dealloc];
}

This one works either, with ARC and without.

Just one addition: With ARC the statement [super dealloc]; must be omitted.

share|improve this answer
    
What if he doesn't want strval to be changed from outside the class? –  trojanfoe Nov 5 '12 at 14:55
    
Then he could declare the property in the .m file too in a class extension. Strictly spoken the property could still be accessed from outside but it is not quite "visible". –  Hermann Klecker Nov 5 '12 at 15:14
    
Or better still, he could make the @property readonly and provide a private setter method within the .m file. –  trojanfoe Nov 5 '12 at 15:17
    
Yes. But when he provides a private setter method then he should care for proper memory management within that too. –  Hermann Klecker Nov 5 '12 at 15:19

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