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I have this JSON file: http://danish-regional-data.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/danish_regional_data.json

How do I remove all the attribues within_5_km, within_10_km, within_25_km, within_50_km, within_100_km for all postcodes?

I have read this question: Remove a JSON attribute

$(document).ready(function() {

    $.getJSON("post.json", function(data) {

    var pc = data.postalcodes;
    for (var id in pc) {
       if(pc.hasOwnProperty(id)) {
          for(var attr in pc[id]) {
             if(pc[id].hasOwnProperty(attr) && attr.indexOf('within_') === 0) {
               delete pc[id][attr];
             }
          }
       }
    }

    $("#json").html(pc);

    });

});
share|improve this question
1  
Well, you need to recursively loop over your JSON object, searching for those attributes, and delete them if/when they're found, per the answer in your linked question. – Hypermattt Nov 5 '12 at 14:42
5  
Warning 12MB .json file in the question – andyb Nov 5 '12 at 14:43
    
If you're looking to do this after a JSON call to get the data it would be redundant as you'd have had to download them all first to remove them. – Rory McCrossan Nov 5 '12 at 14:45
    
@Lübnah - Can you show how to do that? Because in the linked question there is no loop or search :/ – Rails beginner Nov 5 '12 at 14:45
1  
@JaroslawWaliszko Okay, that's a bit pedantic, but yes that's technically correct. JSON == JavaScript Object Notation. So, what I /meant/ was the object the OP has expressed in JSON. Happy now? – Hypermattt Nov 5 '12 at 14:47
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Go to the json url you provided and open the Firebug console. Then drop in the folloing code and execute it:

var p = document.getElementsByTagName('pre');
for(i=0; i < p.length; i++) {

  var data = JSON.parse(p[i].innerHTML);
  var pc = data.postalcodes;

  // this is the code i gave you... the previous is jsut to pull it out of the page
  // in Firebug - this works for me

  for (var id in pc) {
     if(pc.hasOwnProperty(id)) {
        for(var attr in pc[id]) {
          if(pc[id].hasOwnProperty(attr) && attr.indexOf('within_') === 0) {
             console.log('Deleting postalcodes.'+id+'.'+attr);
             delete pc[id][attr];
           }
        }
     }
  }
}

// assume data is the complete json

var pc = data.postalcodes;
for (var id in pc) {
   if(pc.hasOwnProperty(id)) {
      for(var attr in pc[id]) {
         if(pc[id].hasOwnProperty(attr) && attr.indexOf('within_') === 0) {
           delete pc[id][attr];
         }
      }
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Of course, this would be after OP converted the JSON string into an actual object – Hypermattt Nov 5 '12 at 14:53
    
I have tried your solution, but it does not work. I have updated my question with my code. – Rails beginner Nov 5 '12 at 14:58
    
Absolutely no need for hasOwnProperty – Bergi Nov 5 '12 at 15:10
    
@Lübnah: Well i assumed he was already fine with the parsing. The question didnt ask how to convert a json string to a js object it was about nested iteration. – prodigitalson Nov 5 '12 at 15:14
    
@Railsbeginner: Try $("#json").text(JSON.stringify(data)); instead – Bergi Nov 5 '12 at 15:14

JSON truncated:

var data = {"postalcodes":
{"800":{"id":"800","name":"H\u00f8je Taastrup","region_ids":["1084"],"region_names":["Hovedstaden"],"commune_ids":["169"],"commune_names":["H\u00f8je-Taastrup"],"lat":"55.66713","lng":"12.27888", "within_5_km":["800","2620","2630","2633"],"within_10_km":["800","2600","2605","2620"]},
"900":{"id":"900","name":"K\u00f8benhavn C","region_ids":["1084"],"region_names":["Hovedstaden"],"commune_ids":["101"],"commune_names":["K\u00f8benhavns"],"lat":"55.68258093401054","lng":"12.603657245635986","within_5_km":["900","999"]},
"1417":{"commune_id":"390","region_id":"1085"}}};
var pc = data.postalcodes;
for (var id in pc) {
    var entry = pc[id];
    for(var attr in entry) {
        if(attr.indexOf('within_') === 0) {
            delete entry[attr];
        }
    }
}
console.dir(data); // your data object has been augmented at this point

you can also use regular expression

var data = {"postalcodes":
{"800":{"id":"800","name":"H\u00f8je Taastrup","region_ids":["1084"],"region_names":["Hovedstaden"],"commune_ids":["169"],"commune_names":["H\u00f8je-Taastrup"],"lat":"55.66713","lng":"12.27888", "within_5_km":["800","2620","2630","2633"],"within_10_km":["800","2600","2605","2620"]},
"900":{"id":"900","name":"K\u00f8benhavn C","region_ids":["1084"],"region_names":["Hovedstaden"],"commune_ids":["101"],"commune_names":["K\u00f8benhavns"],"lat":"55.68258093401054","lng":"12.603657245635986","within_5_km":["900","999"]},
"1417":{"commune_id":"390","region_id":"1085"}}};
var regexp = new RegExp("^within_", "i");   // case insensitive regex matching strings starting with within_
var pc = data.postalcodes;
for (var id in pc) {
    var entry = pc[id];
    for(var attr in entry) {
        if(regexp.test(attr)) {
            delete entry[attr];
        }
    }
}
console.dir(data);
share|improve this answer

well you can do this:

var postalcodes = YOUR JSON;

for(var code in postalcodes)
{
 delete postalcodes[code].within_5_km;
 .
 .
 .
}

you will probably want to check if the code contains your properties...

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not a fan of eval(), but that should work – Hypermattt Nov 5 '12 at 14:50
    
-1 for using eval – Bergi Nov 5 '12 at 15:10

In ES2016 you can use destructing to pick the fields you want for the subset object.

//ES6 subset of an object by specific fields
var object_private = {name: "alex", age: 25, password: 123};
var {name,age} = object_private, object_public = {name,age}


//method 2 using literals
let object_public = (({name,age})=>({name,age}))(object_private);


//use map if array of objects
    users_array.map(u=>u.id)
share|improve this answer
    
Dropping a chunk of code isn't usually very helpful. Can you explain why this should work? – Mike C Apr 29 at 22:24

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