Sign up ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Importing UTF8-encoded data into mysql is not working for me. UTF8 characters are corrupted. For example Nöthnagel is displayed as Nöthnagel

I have created a sql dump file to do the importing which contains UTF-8 encoded data. For example:

INSERT INTO `users` VALUES(1, 'Fred','Nöthnagel');

The sequence of bytes representing ö in the file is c3 b6 which I believe is correct, as it displays correctly in vim and in my bash shell which has these environment variables set:

$ env | grep -i utf

The mysql db was created as follows:


The mysql table was created so:

CREATE TABLE `users` (  
    `id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,  
    `first_name` varchar(30) NOT NULL,  
    `last_name` varchar(30) NOT NULL,
    PRIMARY KEY (`id`),  
    UNIQUE KEY `last_name` (`last_name`)  

I am importing the dump file like so:

 mysql -u root -psecret mydb < mydump.sql

Please tell me what is missing from the above.

share|improve this question
that's a good summary, but how are you doing the final display that gives Nöthnagel –  Paul Dixon Nov 5 '12 at 14:47
Did you check your file encoding ? –  Pierre de LESPINAY Nov 5 '12 at 14:47
Have tried to use SET NAMES statement ? –  Andrea Nov 5 '12 at 14:48
@PaulDixon The original data is on a django website that uses sqlite. The website is now running mysql. Only the data and the django config have changed, so it is easy to compare them –  handros Nov 5 '12 at 15:01
@PierredeLESPINAY The encoded data for ö in the file is c3 b6. I have checked other sources to confirm that this is indeed utf8 –  handros Nov 5 '12 at 15:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 17 down vote accepted

I think it might have something to do with collation as well, but I'm not sure. In my case it certainly did, since I had to support cyrillic.
Try this, worked for me:

  1. Set initial collation while creating the target database to utf8_general_ci

  2. Add SET NAMES 'utf8' COLLATE 'utf8_general_ci'; to the top of your sql file

  3. Run mysql -u root -p --default-character-set=utf8 yourDB < yourSQLfile.sql

One more thing, in order to properly get the UTF-8 data form your database, you'll have to modify your connection string as well. For example:


Additionally, take a look at what my problem was.

share|improve this answer

The problem was solved by adding this at the top of the sql file:

share|improve this answer

I had a similar problem. There are a number of variables that should be UTF8, not only the database, those include the client, the connection, ther server ...etc.

The solution to your problem is described in this article. The described solution is portable, so it does not only work for utf8, but for all other character sets. You may need to modify it to fit your needs.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer


By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.