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I currently have a few unit tests which share a common set of tests. Here's an example:

import unittest

class BaseTest(unittest.TestCase):

    def testCommon(self):
        print 'Calling BaseTest:testCommon'
        value = 5
        self.assertEquals(value, 5)

class SubTest1(BaseTest):

    def testSub1(self):
        print 'Calling SubTest1:testSub1'
        sub = 3
        self.assertEquals(sub, 3)


class SubTest2(BaseTest):

    def testSub2(self):
        print 'Calling SubTest2:testSub2'
        sub = 4
        self.assertEquals(sub, 4)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    unittest.main()

The output of the above is:

Calling BaseTest:testCommon
.Calling BaseTest:testCommon
.Calling SubTest1:testSub1
.Calling BaseTest:testCommon
.Calling SubTest2:testSub2
.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Ran 5 tests in 0.000s

OK

Is there a way to rewrite the above so that the very first testCommon is not called?

EDIT: Instead of running 5 tests above, I want it to run only 4 tests, 2 from the SubTest1 and another 2 from SubTest2. It seems that Python unittest is running the original BaseTest on its own and I need a mechanism to prevent that from happening.

share|improve this question

9 Answers 9

up vote 71 down vote accepted

Use multiple inheritance, so your class with common tests doesn't itself inherit from TestCase.

import unittest

class CommonTests(object):
    def testCommon(self):
        print 'Calling BaseTest:testCommon'
        value = 5
        self.assertEquals(value, 5)

class SubTest1(unittest.TestCase, CommonTests):

    def testSub1(self):
        print 'Calling SubTest1:testSub1'
        sub = 3
        self.assertEquals(sub, 3)


class SubTest2(unittest.TestCase, CommonTests):

    def testSub2(self):
        print 'Calling SubTest2:testSub2'
        sub = 4
        self.assertEquals(sub, 4)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    unittest.main()
share|improve this answer
1  
That's the most elegant solution so far. –  Thierry Lam Aug 24 '09 at 17:23
    
This even works for setUp and tearDown :) –  Mr Fooz Dec 17 '09 at 18:14
11  
This method only works for setUp and tearDown methods if you reverse the order of the base classes. Because the methods are defined in unittest.TestCase, and they don't call super(), then any setUp and tearDown methods in CommonTests need to be first in the MRO, or they won't be called at all. –  Ian Clelland Oct 11 '10 at 16:35
10  
Just to clarify Ian Clelland's remark so that it will be clearer for people like me: if you add setUp and tearDown methods to CommonTests class, and you want them to be called for each test in derived classes, you have to reverse the order of the base classes, so that it will be: class SubTest1(CommonTests, unittest.TestCase). –  Denis Golomazov Jul 17 '13 at 9:29
3  
I'm not really a fan of this approach. This establishes a contract in the code that classes must inherit from both unittest.TestCase and CommonTests. I think the setUpClass method below is the best and is less prone to human error. Either that or wrapping the BaseTest class in a container class which is a bit more hacky but avoids the skip message in the test run printout. –  David Sanders Oct 17 '14 at 16:23

Do not use multiple inheritance, it will bite you later.

Instead you can just move you base class into the separate module or wrap it with the blank class:

import unittest

class BaseTestCases:

    class BaseTest(unittest.TestCase):

        def testCommon(self):
            print 'Calling BaseTest:testCommon'
            value = 5
            self.assertEquals(value, 5)


class SubTest1(BaseTestCases.BaseTest):

    def testSub1(self):
        print 'Calling SubTest1:testSub1'
        sub = 3
        self.assertEquals(sub, 3)


class SubTest2(BaseTestCases.BaseTest):

    def testSub2(self):
        print 'Calling SubTest2:testSub2'
        sub = 4
        self.assertEquals(sub, 4)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    unittest.main()

The output:

Calling BaseTest:testCommon
.Calling SubTest1:testSub1
.Calling BaseTest:testCommon
.Calling SubTest2:testSub2
.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Ran 4 tests in 0.001s

OK
share|improve this answer
    
This is my favorite. It is the least hacky means and doesn't interfere with overriding methods, doesn't alter the MRO and allows me to define setUp, setUpClass etc. in the base class. –  Hannes May 27 at 22:18

Matthew Marshall's answer is great, but it requires that you inherit from two classes in each of your test cases, which is error-prone. Instead, I use this (python>=2.7):

class BaseTest(unittest.TestCase):

    @classmethod
    def setUpClass(cls):
        if cls is BaseTest:
            raise unittest.SkipTest("Skip BaseTest tests, it's a base class")
        super(BaseTest, cls).setUpClass()
share|improve this answer
1  
That's neat. Is there a way to get around having to use a skip? To me, skips are undesireable and are used to indicate a problem in the current test plan (either with the code or the test)? –  Zachary Young Feb 5 '14 at 19:29
    
@ZacharyYoung I don't know, maybe other answers can help. –  Denis Golomazov Feb 6 '14 at 8:49
    
@ZacharyYoung I've tried to fix this problem, see my answer. –  simonzack Jul 24 '14 at 2:16
    
it's not immediately clear what is inherently error-prone about inheriting from two classes –  jwg Apr 27 at 17:34
    
@jwg see comments to the accepted answer :) You need to inherit each of your test classes from the two base classes; you need to preserve the correct order of them; should you like to add another base test class, you'd need to inherit from it too. There is nothing wrong with mixins, but in this case they can be replaced with a simple skip. –  Denis Golomazov Apr 28 at 9:21

What are you trying to achieve? If you have common test code (assertions, template tests, etc), then place them in methods which aren't prefixed with test so unittest won't load them.

import unittest

class CommonTests(unittest.TestCase):
      def common_assertion(self, foo, bar, baz):
          # whatever common code
          self.assertEqual(foo(bar), baz)

class BaseTest(CommonTests):

    def testCommon(self):
        print 'Calling BaseTest:testCommon'
        value = 5
        self.assertEquals(value, 5)

class SubTest1(CommonTests):

    def testSub1(self):
        print 'Calling SubTest1:testSub1'
        sub = 3
        self.assertEquals(sub, 3)

class SubTest2(CommonTests):

    def testSub2(self):
        print 'Calling SubTest2:testSub2'
        sub = 4
        self.assertEquals(sub, 4)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    unittest.main()
share|improve this answer
    
Under your suggestion, would common_assertion() still be run automatically when testing the subclasses? –  Stewart Apr 23 at 12:12

You can solve this problem with a single command:

del(BaseTest)

So the code would look like this:

import unittest

class BaseTest(unittest.TestCase):

    def testCommon(self):
        print 'Calling BaseTest:testCommon'
        value = 5
        self.assertEquals(value, 5)

class SubTest1(BaseTest):

    def testSub1(self):
        print 'Calling SubTest1:testSub1'
        sub = 3
        self.assertEquals(sub, 3)


class SubTest2(BaseTest):

    def testSub2(self):
        print 'Calling SubTest2:testSub2'
        sub = 4
        self.assertEquals(sub, 4)

del(BaseTest)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    unittest.main()
share|improve this answer
3  
Interesting. Can you explain why this works? –  mrucci Jun 29 '14 at 19:32
1  
BaseTest is a member of the module while it is being defined, so it is available for use as the base class of the SubTests. Just before the definition is complete, del() removes it as a member, so the unittest framework won't find it when it searches for TestCase subclasses in the module. –  mhsmith May 5 at 13:51
    
this is an awesome answer! I like it more than @MatthewMarshall 's because in his solution, you'll get syntax errors from pylint, because the self.assert* methods do not exist in a standard object. –  SimplyKnownAsG May 7 at 17:59
    
Doesn't work if BaseTest is referenced anywhere else in the base class or its subclasses, e.g. when calling super() in method overrides: super( BaseTest, cls ).setUpClass( ) –  Hannes May 27 at 21:57

Matthew's answer is the one I needed to use since I'm on 2.5 still. But as of 2.7 you can use the @unittest.skip() decorator on any test methods you want to skip.

http://docs.python.org/library/unittest.html#skipping-tests-and-expected-failures

You'll need to implement your own skipping decorator to check for the base type. Haven't used this feature before, but off the top of my head you could use BaseTest as a marker type to condition the skip:

def skipBaseTest(obj):
    if type(obj) is BaseTest:
        return unittest.skip("BaseTest tests skipped")
    return lambda func: func
share|improve this answer

A way I've thought of solving this is by hiding the test methods if the base class is used. This way the tests aren't skipped, so the test results can be green instead of yellow in many test reporting tools.

Compared to the mixin method, ide's like PyCharm won't complain that unit test methods are missing from the base class.

If a base class inherits from this class, it will need to override the setUpClass and tearDownClass methods.

class BaseTest(unittest.TestCase):
    @classmethod
    def setUpClass(cls):
        cls._test_methods = []
        if cls is BaseTest:
            for name in dir(cls):
                if name.startswith('test') and callable(getattr(cls, name)):
                    cls._test_methods.append((name, getattr(cls, name)))
                    setattr(cls, name, lambda self: None)

    @classmethod
    def tearDownClass(cls):
        if cls is BaseTest:
            for name, method in cls._test_methods:
                setattr(cls, name, method)
            cls._test_methods = []
share|improve this answer

Another option is not to execute

unittest.main()

Instead of that you can use

suite = unittest.TestLoader().loadTestsFromTestCase(TestClass)
unittest.TextTestRunner(verbosity=2).run(suite)

So you only execute the tests in the class TestClass

share|improve this answer

Change the BaseTest method name to setUp:

class BaseTest(unittest.TestCase):
    def setUp(self):
        print 'Calling BaseTest:testCommon'
        value = 5
        self.assertEquals(value, 5)


class SubTest1(BaseTest):
    def testSub1(self):
        print 'Calling SubTest1:testSub1'
        sub = 3
        self.assertEquals(sub, 3)


class SubTest2(BaseTest):
    def testSub2(self):
        print 'Calling SubTest2:testSub2'
        sub = 4
        self.assertEquals(sub, 4)

Output:

Ran 2 tests in 0.000s

Calling BaseTest:testCommon Calling
SubTest1:testSub1 Calling
BaseTest:testCommon Calling
SubTest2:testSub2

From the documentation:

TestCase.setUp()
Method called to prepare the test fixture. This is called immediately before calling the test method; any exception raised by this method will be considered an error rather than a test failure. The default implementation does nothing.

share|improve this answer
    
That would work, what if I have n testCommon, should I place them all under setUp? –  Thierry Lam Aug 24 '09 at 16:50
1  
Yes you should put all code that is not an actual test case under setUp. –  Brian R. Bondy Aug 24 '09 at 16:56
    
But if a subclass has more than one test... method, setUp gets executed over and over and over again, once per such method; so it's NOT a good idea to put tests there! –  Alex Martelli Aug 24 '09 at 18:14
    
Not really sure what OP wanted in terms of when executed in a more complex scenario. –  Brian R. Bondy Aug 24 '09 at 18:36

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