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Here is the requirement:

I've got a list of properties. Each property has a tag of type int and a value of one of the following types: (bool, char, string, int, long). some sample properties:

tag: 1, value: "some string"
tag: 14, value: true
tag: 20, value: 123

There is also a list of rules. Each rule is like a property, plus one of the following operators: (<, >, <=, >=, ==, !=, startsWith). The startsWith operator is used to check whether one string starts with another one.

Some sample rules:

tag: 1, value: "hello", operator: ==
tag: 14, value: true, operator: ==

Each list of rules is called a Criteria and is used to validate a list of properties. A criteria validates a list of properties if only all the rules of the criteria are met. For example, the two rules above make up a criteria. This criteria does not validate the aforementioned list of properties because the 1st rule forces the value of tag (1) to be equal (==) to "hello" which is not.

The following criteria:

tag: 1, value: "some string", operator: ==
tag: 20, value: 100, operator: >
tag: 20, value: 120, operator: <

does not validate the above properties too, because although the first two rules are met, the last rule, which forces the value of tag (20) to be less than 120 is not true. Therefore the whole criteria does not validate the properties.
And here is a criteria that validates to true:

tag: 1, value: "some", operator: startsWith
tag: 14, value: false, operator: !=
tag: 20, value: 123, operator: >=
tag: 20, value: 100, operator: >

So far I have come up with the following code. But I am stuck in the implementation of StartsWith operator. Maybe I should of chosen a totally different approach to solve this problem. Any advice and help would be greatly appreciated!

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include <set>
#include <algorithm>
#include <tr1/memory>

using namespace std;

/////////////////// Property Class //////////////////////

class Property
{
public:
    enum Operator
    {
        EQ,     // ==
        NEQ,    // !=
        GT,     // >
        GTE,    // >=
        LT,     // <
        LTE,    // <=
        SW,     // Starts With
    } mOperator;

    Property() {};
    Property(const int tag, Operator op)
            : mTag(tag), mOperator(op) {}
    virtual ~Property() {}
    virtual void* GetValue() = 0;
    virtual bool IsEqual(void* value) = 0;
    virtual bool Compare(void* value, Property::Operator op) = 0;
    virtual void Print() = 0;
    int mTag;
    bool operator<(const Property &property) const
    {
        return mTag < property.mTag;
    }
};
struct PropertyPtrComp
{
    bool operator()(const std::tr1::shared_ptr<Property> lhs, const std::tr1::shared_ptr<Property> rhs) const
    {
        return lhs->mTag < rhs->mTag;
    }
};

/////////////////// TypedProperty Class /////////////////

template< typename T >
class TypedProperty : public Property
{
public:
    TypedProperty (const int tag, const T& value, Property::Operator op)
            : Property(tag, op), mValue(value) {}
    void* GetValue()
    {
        return &mValue;
    }
    bool IsEqual(void* value)
    {
        return *((T*)value) == mValue;
    }
    bool Compare(void* value, Property::Operator op)
    {
        // cout << "comparing " << *((T*)value) << " with " << mValue << endl;
        switch (op)
        {
           case Property::EQ:
               return *((T*)value) == mValue;
           case Property::NEQ:
               return *((T*)value) != mValue;
           case Property::GT:
               return mValue > *((T*)value) ;
           case Property::LT:
               return mValue < *((T*)value) ;
           case Property::SW:
           {
               if (typeid((T*)value) == typeid(string*))
               {
               // dont know what to do!
               //return ((string)mValue).compare(0, ((string*)value)->length(), (string)(*((string*)value)));
               }
           }
           default:
               return *((T*)value) == mValue;
        }
    }
    void Print()
    {
        cout << "Tag: " <<  mTag << ", Value: " << mValue << endl;
    }
    T mValue;
};

/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

typedef std::tr1::shared_ptr<Property> PropertyPtr;

/////////////////// PropertyList Class /////////////////

class PropertyList
{
public:
    PropertyList() {};
    virtual ~PropertyList() {};
    template <class T>
    void Add(int tag, T value, Property::Operator op = Property::EQ)
    {
        PropertyPtr ptr(new TypedProperty<T>(tag, value, op));
        mProperties.insert(ptr);
    }
    void Print()
    {
        cout << "-----------" << endl;
        for (set<PropertyPtr>::iterator itr = mProperties.begin(); itr != mProperties.end(); itr++)
        {
            (*itr)->Print();
        }
    }
    set<PropertyPtr, PropertyPtrComp> mProperties;
};

//////////////////// Check Subset ///////////////////////
/*
 * Checks if subset is included in superset
 */
bool CheckSubset(set<PropertyPtr, PropertyPtrComp> &superset, 
         set<PropertyPtr, PropertyPtrComp> &subset)
{
    if (subset.size() > superset.size() || subset.empty()) return false;
    typename set<PropertyPtr>::iterator litr = superset.begin();
    for (typename set<PropertyPtr>::iterator ritr = subset.begin(); ritr != subset.end();)
    {
        while (litr != superset.end())
        {
            PropertyPtr lProp = (PropertyPtr)*litr;
            PropertyPtr rProp = (PropertyPtr)*ritr;
            if (lProp->mTag == rProp->mTag)
            {
                if (lProp->Compare(rProp->GetValue(), rProp->mOperator))
                {
                    litr++;
                    break;
                }
                return false;
            }
            else
            {
                litr++;
            }
        }
        ritr++;
        if (litr == superset.end() && ritr != subset.end()) return false;
    }
    return true;
}

int main()
{
    PropertyList properties;

    string s = "bye";

    properties.Add(1, "hello");
    properties.Add(2, 12);
    properties.Add(3, 34);
    properties.Add(4, "bye");

    properties.Print();

    PropertyList ruleSet1;
    ruleSet1.Add(2, 12, Property::EQ);
    ruleSet1.Add(4, "bye", Property::EQ);

    ruleSet1.Print();

    if(CheckSubset(properties.mProperties, ruleSet1.mProperties)) 
    cout << "RuleSet1 verified!" << endl;   // <<<< should be printed
    else
        cout << "RuleSet1 NOT verified!" << endl; 


    PropertyList ruleSet2;
    string hel = "hel";
    ruleSet2.Add(1, hel, Property::SW);
    ruleSet2.Add(2, 13, Property::NEQ);

    ruleSet2.Print();

    if (CheckSubset(properties.mProperties, ruleSet2.mProperties)) 
        cout << "RuleSet2 verified!" << endl;   // <<<< should be printed
    else
        cout << "RuleSet2 NOT verified!" << endl;


}
share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Mark B, bensiu, Tom Seidel, hirschhornsalz, Nimit Dudani Nov 6 '12 at 12:11

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
I think the wall of code makes more sense for the code reviews SE. –  Mark B Nov 5 '12 at 14:58
    
I don't see a question here. Perhaps there's one hiding in the title, but I'm not sure what it is. The answer, however, seems to be that you'll want to provide either comparison operator or a hash function and to use it to provide the set operations. –  eh9 Nov 5 '12 at 15:18

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Do not use void*, try boost::variant. Build test functors that operate on each and every operator. The value you compare to is another variant. You may need functors of functors so you can do whatever conversion you want to do between two variants.

This separates type and storage from algorithms on each type. And boost does variant types better than you do.

Your tests then become a pair of tag and std::function<bool(boost::variant<int,long,string,etc>)> which does the test.

An example, with only two types.

Start with a map from int to variant: typedef std::map<int, boost::variant<int, string>> MyMap.

Now a test. A test is 3 things -- an id, a value (which is a variant) and a test to compare that variant to the data. If we don't allow strings and ints to be equal, we get:

template<typename T>
struct CheckOneTypeEquality
{
  T const* value;
  bool operator()( T const& other ) const
  {
    return other == *value;
  }
  template<typename U>
  bool operator()( U const& other ) const
  {
    return false;
  }
  CheckOneTypeEquality( T const& value_ ):value(&value_) {}
};

template<typename Variant>
struct TestVariantEquality
{
  Variant* v;
  struct FindRightToCompare
  {
    Variant* other;
    template<typename T>
    bool operator()( T const& value ) const
    {
      return apply_visitor( *other, CheckOneTypeEquality<T>(value) );
    }
    FindRightToCompare( Variant const& other_ ): other(other_) {}
  };

  bool operator()( Variant const& other ) const
  {
    return apply_visitor( *v, FindRightToCompare(other) );
  }
};

... which does a compile-time checked equality comparison. All the above does a double apply_visitor on both the left and right operands, and CheckOneTypeEquality<T> has the T match the type of the left operand, and the right operand is passed in as a U to the operator().

In this case, we only support equality of the same type -- if we wanted to allow int and long to compare, we could just appropriately specialize the CheckOneTypeEquality<T>::operator()<U>.

We can also abstract the above by wrapping the CheckOneTypeEquality in a non-template type and passing it into the TestVariantEquality class, which does nothing except arrange for the double-dispatch of the two types we are comparing. Which means that the TestVariantEquality (well, the more generic version, which takes the final comparison functor as a template parameter) could be written once, and you'd just have to write a CheckOneTypeEquality equivalent functor for each comparison test.

Disclaimer: Above code has not been compiled by me, and is based off a quick reading of online docs. Namespaces are not used in the above code because I was lazy, but everything is basically from std or boost or a sub-namespace of boost.

Note that TestVariantEquality (or similar functors) can be used to initialize a std::function<bool(Variant<...> const&)>. So the function that produces the test functions should return std::function<bool(Variant<...> const&)>, and internally can do the above type of stuff.

properties should be a std::map<int, boost::variant<blah blah>>. Your tests should be a std::multimap<int, std::function<bool(boost::variant<blah blah> const&)>>.

Load the data you are testing into the properties. Build the tests using something like the above technique. No virtual functions required, no void pointers, and everything is compile-time type checked.

share|improve this answer
    
I would appreciate it if you could post a more detailed answer –  Meysam Nov 5 '12 at 18:38
    
What parts do you not understand? boost::variant has a bunch of docs on the web, do you understand them? Do you know what a functor is? –  Yakk Nov 5 '12 at 19:07
    
I know what a functor is, I just cant get my head around a solution that uses variant and functors to achieve my purpose. –  Meysam Nov 5 '12 at 19:18
    
So I added some explicit details. –  Yakk Nov 5 '12 at 20:56
    
Thank you very much for the effort you put in providing some sample code. I wasn't aware of the variant and apply_visitor in boost. They quite seem like what I need. I accepted your answer and will try to use this approach. I hope you can help me further if I get stuck somewhere in the middle of it. –  Meysam Nov 6 '12 at 7:39

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