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I've always been taught to design functions, objects and APIs in such a way that doesn't put the responsibility of your function's safety in the caller's hands. A bad example:

void caller()
{
  int a[10] = { 0 };

  myFunc( a );
}

// HEY DEVELOPERS: remember that x must be 10 or more
void myFunc( int *x )
{
  // loop through values in x array while <10.
}

I've been always taught that a function should be responsible for it's own safety. So I would do this:

void myFunc( int *x, size_t size )
{
  // check x for null, return if size is <10. loop through 10 values in x array.
}

Now, I've been told (by other developers) that if the safety check is done by the caller (to check that the variable is being passed in is 10 or more), this is perfectly fine as long as the documentation (comments) is available.

What are your thoughts on this contrived scenario? Where do you stand? Is there any documentation for or against my logic?

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In this contrived scenario, the myFunc` function should operate on size values, not on 10 values. (To answer the more general question: Moving validation into callers makes static analysis more difficult.) –  Raymond Chen Nov 5 '12 at 15:12
1  
Use a template, or at least iterator pairs. Don't do the crappy size thing. –  Puppy Nov 5 '12 at 15:18
    
@Raymond: Can you explain more on why static analysis is more difficult? –  MarkP Nov 5 '12 at 16:04
    
imho you are right in principle - but from a pragmatic point of view, of course it is sufficient to say in the user doc "down put a cat in the microwave" instead of making the microwave check if a cat has been put in –  Zane Nov 5 '12 at 16:14
    
@Zane and who knows, there might be genuinely good reasons to put a cat in a microwave. –  juanchopanza Nov 5 '12 at 18:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think a good approach is to place the responsibility in the callers hands, but provide interfaces that can be used with safe constructs. For example, here the requirement is that the caller give you a valid range over which to execute something. For example,

template <typename Iterator>
void doSomething(Iterator first, Iterator last)
{
  for (Iterator it = first, it != last, ++it)
  {
    std::cout << (*it) << " ";
  }
  std::cout << "\n";
}

Then it is in the caller's hands. This error-prone call can still be used:

void caller()
{
  int a[10] = { 0 };   
  doSomething( a, a+10 );
}

But safer constructs are also supported:

void caller1()
{
  int a[10] = { 0 };   
  doSomething( std::begin(a), std::end(a) );
}

void caller2()
{
  std::vector<int> v = ....;
  doSomething(v.begin(), v.end());
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is a good example because it is very difficult (even impossible) for doSomething() to check the validity of its parameters, but it is usually very easy for the caller to do it. –  Gorpik Nov 5 '12 at 15:28
    
Very nice example. –  MarkP Nov 5 '12 at 19:10

There's nothing wrong with taking responsibility for ensuring that bad values being fed into a function don't result in unpredictable or fatal behaviour. You might want to look up "Design by Contract" which is along these lines. In the example you give, given that the function can never tell how big the passed array is, it is common sense for the size to be passed in as a parameter. That said, you can't of course guarantee that they won't just have passed in an uninitialised variable for example.

There are other schools of thought that the caller should take responsibility for what they pass in. This is usually justified on the grounds of performance (i.e. lots of validation could slow the function down considerably.)

Either way, your function could, and possibly should check for conditions which could be fatal using either asserts (at debug time,) exceptions or error statuses. If performance becomes an issue then you can always either compile out or configure off.

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I always assert function inputs are within the prescribed range, with documentation to support. However, if the input type allows it then you must accept that inputs can be out of the range you expect, in which case I will ensure the function operates without crashing, but then log the input error. It is often difficult if not impossible to avoid a garbage in garbage out situation, but you must work to help the programmer to notice his error, or at least help him to debug it.

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