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I am using StringBuilder class in Java to make make a large string value in a method in following way:

void parent() {

   int result = 0;

   while(true) {
     String s = "Some value";
     result = child(s);

     if(result == -1) {
        break;
     }
   }
}

int child(String s) {

   result = xDao.createNativeQuery(s).getResultList();

   if(result == null) {
       return -1;
   }

   StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder()

   builder.append("INSERT INTO table_name VALUES(");

   for(int i = 0; i < result.length; i++) {
          builder.append(Message.Format("{0}, {0}..", result[i].val1, result[i].val2..); // This will create some big string.
   }

   // Do some operation with builder.
   dataDao.createNativeQuery(builder.toString()).executeUpdate();


   return 0;
}

Now say, child() is running for 100+ times, then after 70th time or so (or any higher number), I am getting java.lang.OutOfMemoryError.

I have gone through this article http://mohammed-technical.blogspot.in/2010/09/javalangoutofmemoryerror-with.html

As it explains how the StringBuilder just doubles it size. But in my case, I am always creating a new instance of StringBuilder inside child, then why it is throwing java.lang.OutOfMemoryError because of StringBuilder?

Any suggestion please?

UPDATE:

I am actually creating SQL insert statement using StringBuilder. So following operation will happen:

 builder.append("INSERT INTO table_name VALUES(");

 While(condition) {
          builder.append(Message.Format("{0}, {0}..", var1, var2..); // This will create some big string.
 }

and then finally calling following lines in child() itself:

dataDao.createNativeQuery(builder.toString()).executeUpdate();
share|improve this question
    
What's your condition? It seems to me that your condition isn't stopping out. –  durron597 Nov 5 '12 at 15:53
    
Can you post stack trace of OOME? –  Tomasz Nurkiewicz Nov 5 '12 at 15:53
    
What operations are you doing with your StringBuilder instance? –  Luiggi Mendoza Nov 5 '12 at 15:53
1  
Could you detail condition and someConditionMet? –  sp00m Nov 5 '12 at 15:54
2  
When you use JDBC resource you need to clean them up correctly by close()ing them. If you don't this will result in a memory leak. The first time you aware of this leak could be when you try to build the string and there is not enough memory left. –  Peter Lawrey Nov 5 '12 at 16:09

1 Answer 1

When you use JDBC resource you need to clean them up correctly by close()ing them. If you don't this will result in a memory leak. The first time you aware of this leak could be when you try to build the string and there is not enough memory left.

Did not get your point. Can you explain little more that what you are trying to point?

When you create a PreparedStatement or ResultSet, you have to close() them or they continue to use up memory as their Connection holds a reference to them.

The following code suggests you are creating a Statement, calling executeUpdate() on it and then discarding it. Unfortunately this doesn't work with JDBC.

dataDao.createNativeQuery(builder.toString()).executeUpdate();

http://www.java-blog.com/correct-closing-jdbc-resources

http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/websphere/library/bestpractices/closing_and_releasing_jdbc_resources.html

http://blog.shinetech.com/2007/08/04/how-to-close-jdbc-resources-properly-every-time/

share|improve this answer
    
I am not managing connections myself in the code. I am using Spring and Hibernate/JPA to manage connections. Still there is a point of connection not getting closed properly? –  Arjit Nov 5 '12 at 16:23
    
AFAIK, Even with Spring you need to close your Statements. –  Peter Lawrey Nov 5 '12 at 16:28

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