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Consider an array of datetimes:

2010-07-17 16:09:00 -0700
2010-07-17 16:10:00 -0700
2010-07-17 16:12:00 -0700
2010-07-17 17:44:00 -0700
2010-07-18 02:12:00 -0700

What is a clean and idiomatic way to iterate over the array and insert missing minutes, so that the output is:

2010-07-17 16:09:00 -0700
2010-07-17 16:10:00 -0700
2012-07-17 16:11:00 -0700
2010-07-17 16:12:00 -0700
2010-07-17 16:13:00 -0700
...

Ruby 1.9.3

EDIT: More info:

It is actually an array of hashes, with datetimes as the key:

2010-07-17 16:09:00 -0700 => 5
2010-07-17 16:10:00 -0700 => 22
2010-07-17 16:12:00 -0700 => 3

So, each missing minute should have the value of the previous existing minute.

Also, not using Rails.

share|improve this question
5  
The whole premise of this question is preposterous. If you want an array of DateTimes one minute apart, why does it matter what you start with? –  Mark Thomas Nov 5 '12 at 16:00
    
Just regenerate the whole array using a loop a like this : stackoverflow.com/questions/501253/… –  Anthony Alberto Nov 5 '12 at 16:02
    
See edit. Added info. –  B Seven Nov 5 '12 at 16:54
    
What do you want to set the key as for missing datetimes? –  Sunny Juneja Nov 5 '12 at 18:22
    
The value for a missing minute should be value for the previous minute. –  B Seven Nov 6 '12 at 1:05

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted
require 'date'

# dummy dates
dates = "2010-07-17 16:09:00 -0700
2010-07-17 16:10:00 -0700
2010-07-17 16:12:00 -0700
2010-07-17 17:44:00 -0700
2010-07-18 02:12:00 -0700"

datetimes = dates.lines.map{|s| DateTime.parse(s) }

continuous_datetimes = [datetimes.min]

while continuous_datetimes.last < datetimes.max
  continuous_datetimes.push( continuous_datetimes.last + 1.0/24.0/60.0 )
end

continuous_datetimes.first(10).each{|d| puts d}
# 2010-07-17T16:09:00-07:00
# 2010-07-17T16:10:00-07:00
# 2010-07-17T16:11:00-07:00
# 2010-07-17T16:12:00-07:00
# 2010-07-17T16:13:00-07:00
# 2010-07-17T16:14:00-07:00
# 2010-07-17T16:15:00-07:00
# 2010-07-17T16:16:00-07:00
# 2010-07-17T16:17:00-07:00
# 2010-07-17T16:18:00-07:00

EDIT

the following code reflects your hash structure.

Setup:

require 'date'

# dummy dates
hash = {
  DateTime.parse("2010-07-17 16:09:00 -0700") => 5,
  DateTime.parse("2010-07-17 16:10:00 -0700") => 22,
  DateTime.parse("2010-07-17 16:12:00 -0700") => 3
}

Actual code:

new_hash = hash.inject(Hash[ *hash.first ]) do |tmp,kv|
  while tmp.keys.last < kv.first
    tmp[ tmp.keys.last + 1.0/24.0/60.0 ] = kv.last
  end
  tmp
end

Output:

new_hash.each {|k,v| puts "#{k} => #{v}" }
# 2010-07-17T16:09:00-07:00 => 5
# 2010-07-17T16:10:00-07:00 => 22
# 2010-07-17T16:11:00-07:00 => 3
# 2010-07-17T16:12:00-07:00 => 3
share|improve this answer
    
I don't want to install rails because it would greatly increase the overhead and time to run tests. –  B Seven Nov 6 '12 at 6:36
    
Well, you don't have to :-). Besides, active support's 1.minute would not work here, so never mind. (i deleted my comment in order not to mislead others reading this post) –  p11y Nov 6 '12 at 11:30

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