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Storing state and recovering state is a major issue in Android, simple tasks are complicated because it recommended that the state should be stored and restored (using Intents, Parcelables, and etc.) and is further complicated by threading issues (using AsyncTaskLoaders, LoaderManagers, and etc.).

However, as I understand, static variables persist through out a process (which here relates to the app running) and storing state and funneling threading through these static variables is signficantly easier.

Of course the state will be lost if the process killed, but how often does this actually happen to an application running in the foreground?

Further maintaing state is nice but not critical to most applications, especially if losing the state is rare.

Also if the state is that critical to you should probably not be using the functions provided by the Activity life cycle to store and recover that state, because it is not guaranteed that they will be called when the process is killed, instead you should be constantly storing your state in some database.

I think the recommended method is overkill and unnecessarily overcomplicates the development of most apps, what is the reason behind its acceptance?

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static has a whole lot of problems too. Ranging from bad style & potential leaking to concurrency issues –  zapl Nov 5 '12 at 16:03
    
Is the recommended method immune from those issues? –  Emil Davtyan Nov 5 '12 at 16:13

1 Answer 1

Of course the state will be lost if the process killed, but how often does this actually happen to an application running in the foreground?

By definition, never, short of the battery running out, the user turning off the device, etc.

However, you are not in the foreground very much and may not stay there very long, depending upon what the user does.

Further maintaing state is nice but not critical to most applications, especially if losing the state is rare.

Losing state happens very frequently, because applications are not in the foreground very often or necessarily for very long.

Also if the state is that critical to you should probably not be using the functions provided by the Activity life cycle to store and recover that state, because it is not guaranteed that they will be called when the process is killed, instead you should be constantly storing your state in some database.

The lifecycle methods are not for that kind of state. They are for data that is stuff that should be kept around where possible to simplify user navigation (e.g., handling orientation changes), but are not needed to be durable (which should go in a persistent store).

To draw an analogy, when you typed your question in this StackOverflow page, what you typed does not need to be saved to the Web server until you submit the form. However, your Web browser should certainly hold onto this data while you switch between browser tabs, or when you minimize (and later restore) the browser window. And, your Web browser might even hold onto this data in some temporary file, where they also hold the list of open tabs, so that if your browser crashes, they can restore your state as best as possible. The differences between "what is stored on the Web server", "what is stored in the process heap", and "what is stored in a temporary spot on the local filesystem" determine what sorts of data are tied into those strategies.

Similarly, in Android, the differences between "what is stored in static data members", "what is passed around via Intent extras and the like", and "what is stored in a persistent spot, like a database" determine what sorts of data are tied into those strategies.

what is the reason behind its acceptance?

Because your approach tends to cause memory leaks, unless the static caches are handled very carefully.

And, because your approach muddies the distinction between true global data and data that logically is part of some discrete operation and therefore should be passed via Intent extras or other operation-specific means.

Those are in addition to all the other classic reasons why static data members are considered poor form in Java.

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So when the application is not in the foreground, is the process being killed regularly or only under-low memory conditions? –  Emil Davtyan Nov 5 '12 at 16:48
    
@Emil: Since low memory conditions are fairly regular, particularly for older devices and more-elaborate apps, I would say those two cases are nearly the same. Again, it all depends on what the user is doing, both actively (e.g., launching several apps in succession) or indirectly (e.g., have apps installed with AlarmManager events and the like that are firing). –  CommonsWare Nov 5 '12 at 17:06

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