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I want to do the opposite of making instances of a class noncopyable, that is, make sure that instances of a particular class can be passed only as a copy and not as a reference. If any function tries to receive it by reference, I would like it to give a compilation error (ideally) or a run time error.

I dont think making operator & private is going to do it, is there a legitimate way of doing this.

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Fair question but chances are if you want to do this it's indicative of bad design. This will prohibit you from factoring a large function if this object is used throughout. –  djechlin Nov 5 '12 at 16:19
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Interesting idea, but this would basically be the same as disallowing a pointer to that kind of object, and that seems pretty unreasonable to me. –  Dan F Nov 5 '12 at 16:19
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@san - not at all, I often do something like Type& t = *pointerToType; to avoid juggling pointer dereferences. That only subverts the intent if the function it's passed to plans to take ownership which for many many functions will not be the case. –  djechlin Nov 5 '12 at 16:39
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@san - Interestingly enough, C++11 provides a std::addressof function that provides the address of an object even if you override or hide the & operator. –  Bo Persson Nov 5 '12 at 16:50
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For a specific object you can prevent taking the address of a variable by declaring the variable as register. I.e. register int a; &a; is not allowed. But this won't help with what is being asked for here. –  amaurea Nov 5 '12 at 18:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I dont think making operator & private is going to do it, is there a legitimate way of doing this.

No, because the & you use in function signatures for pass-by-reference is not an operator. You're talking either about the address-of operator (unary) or bitwise-and operator (binary). So it has nothing to do with pass-by-reference.

There's no way to disallow pass-by-reference for a type.

I doubt your motivation is strong enough to do this, and you appear to have a bad understanding of the passing mechanism:

If any function tries to receive it by reference, I would like it to give a compilation error (ideally) or a run time error.

A function either passes a parameter by reference, or by value. It's decided by its declaration, and I think your confusion stems from here. For example:

void foo(X x);

takes the parameter x by value. There's no way to pass it by reference. No way. Likewise:

void foo(X& x)

takes it by reference, and it always will.

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thanks that was helpful –  san Nov 5 '12 at 16:29

That's impossible. Any named variable can bind to a reference variable of the appropriate type. That's just how the language works.

In particular, you could never have a copy constructor with your restriction, so you couldn't actually pass the object by value!

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+1 for the reasoning. –  Olaf Dietsche Nov 5 '12 at 16:25

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