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Why doesn't the first print statement output what I expect:

first = This is a test string, sec = This is a test string

Since both * and + are greedy, why does the the inner * i.e. inside the "((" in the first match not consuming the entire string?

use strict;
use warnings;

my $string = "This is a test string";
$string =~ /((.*)*)/; 
print "first = $1, sec = $2\n";  #prints "first = This is a test string, sec ="

$string =~ /((.+)*)/;
print "first = $1, sec = $2\n";  #prints "first = This is a test string, sec = This is a test string"
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3  
The better question is "why are you doing that?" :) Is this just because you are curious about this odd edge case, or are you trying to actually use this? –  brian d foy Aug 24 '09 at 19:00
    
Brian, I was just curious. :-) –  chappar Aug 25 '09 at 3:11

4 Answers 4

up vote 17 down vote accepted

In the first regex .* is matched two times. The first time it matches the whole string. The second time it matches the empty string at the end, because .* matches the empty string when there is nothing else to match.

This does not happen with the other regex because .+ can't match the empty string.

Edit: As to what goes where: $2 will contain what is matched the last time .* / .+ are applied. $1 will contain what is matched by (.*)* / (.+)*, i.e. the whole string.

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Right. But since the brackets surround the string - I would expect the whole thing inside the brackets to be $2 (and not just the *) –  Anna Aug 24 '09 at 17:21
    
So where does the outer () match end up? From your description I would've guessed $3, but it didn't go there. –  user79758 Aug 24 '09 at 17:22
1  
@Anna Groups are counted by the opening parenthesis, so $1 is the whole string, where $2 is the inner set of parentheses. –  Peter Di Cecco Aug 24 '09 at 17:24
1  
The inner match is actually $2, the outer is $1. When the inner part matches a second time it "overwrites" the captured output from the first time it matched. If the inner (.*) matches several times, only the last match is preserved as $2. –  sth Aug 24 '09 at 17:26
    
@sepp2k, since the regex match starts from the inner *, it has to consume the entire string. So, why $2 is empty in the first case? –  chappar Aug 24 '09 at 17:28

Running it with "use re 'debug'" results in:

Compiling REx "((.*)*)"
Final program:
   1: OPEN1 (3)
   3:   CURLYX[0] {0,32767} (12)
   5:     OPEN2 (7)
   7:       STAR (9) # <====
   8:         REG_ANY (0)
   9:     CLOSE2 (11)
  11:   WHILEM[1/1] (0)
  12:   NOTHING (13)
  13: CLOSE1 (15)
  15: END (0)
minlen 0

Matching REx "((.*)*)" against "This is a test string"
   0 <> <This is a >         |  1:OPEN1(3)
   0 <> <This is a >         |  3:CURLYX[0] {0,32767}(12)
   0 <> <This is a >         | 11:  WHILEM[1/1](0)
                                    whilem: matched 0 out of 0..32767
   0 <> <This is a >         |  5:    OPEN2(7)
   0 <> <This is a >         |  7:    STAR(9) # <====
                                      REG_ANY can match 21 times out of 2147483647...
  21 < test string> <>       |  9:      CLOSE2(11)
  21 < test string> <>       | 11:      WHILEM[1/1](0)
                                        whilem: matched 1 out of 0..32767
  21 < test string> <>       |  5:        OPEN2(7)
  21 < test string> <>       |  7:        STAR(9) # <====

  # This is where the outputs really start to diverge
  # --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                          REG_ANY can match 0 times out of 2147483647...
  21 < test string> <>       |  9:          CLOSE2(11) # <==== Succeeded
  21 < test string> <>       | 11:          WHILEM[1/1](0)
                                            whilem: matched 2 out of 0..32767
                                            whilem: empty match detected, trying continuation...
  # --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

  21 < test string> <>       | 12:            NOTHING(13)
  21 < test string> <>       | 13:            CLOSE1(15)
  21 < test string> <>       | 15:            END(0)
Match successful!

Compiling REx "((.+)*)"
Final program:
   1: OPEN1 (3)
   3:   CURLYX[0] {0,32767} (12)
   5:     OPEN2 (7)
   7:       PLUS (9) # <====
   8:         REG_ANY (0)
   9:     CLOSE2 (11)
  11:   WHILEM[1/1] (0)
  12:   NOTHING (13)
  13: CLOSE1 (15)
  15: END (0)
minlen 0

Matching REx "((.+)*)" against "This is a test string"
   0 <> <This is a >         |  1:OPEN1(3)
   0 <> <This is a >         |  3:CURLYX[0] {0,32767}(12)
   0 <> <This is a >         | 11:  WHILEM[1/1](0)
                                    whilem: matched 0 out of 0..32767
   0 <> <This is a >         |  5:    OPEN2(7)
   0 <> <This is a >         |  7:    PLUS(9) # <====
                                      REG_ANY can match 21 times out of 2147483647...
  21 < test string> <>       |  9:      CLOSE2(11)
  21 < test string> <>       | 11:      WHILEM[1/1](0)
                                        whilem: matched 1 out of 0..32767
  21 < test string> <>       |  5:        OPEN2(7)
  21 < test string> <>       |  7:        PLUS(9) # <====

  # This is where the outputs really start to diverge
  # ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                          REG_ANY can match 0 times out of 2147483647...
                                          failed... # <==== Failed
                                        whilem: failed, trying continuation...
  # ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

  21 < test string> <>       | 12:        NOTHING(13)
  21 < test string> <>       | 13:        CLOSE1(15)
  21 < test string> <>       | 15:        END(0)
Match successful!
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1  
@Brad, how do i read this? Is there any documentation? –  chappar Aug 24 '09 at 18:34
1  
See "perldoc re", or perldoc.perl.org/re.html, which leads you to "perldoc perldebug" and perldoc.perl.org/perldebug.html#Debugging-regular-expressions. –  Ether Aug 24 '09 at 19:40
    
@Brad & Ether: Yeah, I'm going to be honest, I wish I were cooler and understood that output, but I can barely follow it. The link Ether points to says this, to which I can only say, amen: "In order to understand this typically voluminous output, one must not only have some idea about how regular expression matching works in general, but also know how Perl's regular expressions are internally compiled into an automaton." –  Telemachus Aug 24 '09 at 20:06
    
This would be a better answer if it included some commentary on what we're supposed to notice about those two outputs. –  Rob Kennedy Aug 24 '09 at 21:07
    
I highlighted the differences, hopefully it is easier to figure out. –  Brad Gilbert Aug 24 '09 at 21:22

The problem with the first regex is a combination of the fact that ()* only saves the last match and .* matches an empty string (i.e. nothing). So, given

"aaab" =~ /(.)*/;

$1 will be "b". If you combine that behavior with the fact that .* matches an empty string, you can see that there are two matches of the inner capture: "This is a test string" and "". Since the empty string came last it gets saved to $2. $1 is the whole capture, so it is equivalent to "This is a test string" . "". The second case works as you expect it to because .+ will not match an empty string.

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I don't have an answer, but I do have different way of framing the issue, using simpler and perhaps more realistic regular expressions.

The first two examples behave exactly as I expect: .* consumes the entire string and the regular expression returns a list with only one element. But the third regular expression returns a list with 2 elements.

use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dumper;

$_ = "foo";
print Dumper( [ /^(.*)/g ] ); # ('foo')     As expected.
print Dumper( [ /.(.*)/g ] ); # ('oo')      As expected.
print Dumper( [ /(.*)/g  ] ); # ('foo', '') Why?

Many of the answers so far have emphasized that .* will match anything. While true, this response does not go to the heart of the matter, which is this: Why is the regular expression engine still hunting after .* has consumed the entire string? Under other circumstances (such as the first two examples), .* does not throw in an extra empty string for good measure.

Update after the useful comments from Chas. Owens. The first evaluation of any of the three examples results in .* matching the entire string. If we could intervene and call pos() at that moment, the engine would indeed be at the end of the string (at least as we perceive the string; see the comments from Chas. for more insight on this). However, the /g option tells Perl to try to match the entire regex again. That second attempt will fail for examples #1 and #2, and that failure will cause the engine to stop hunting. However, with regex #3, the engine will get another match: an empty string. Then the /g option tells the engine to try the entire pattern yet again. Now there really is nothing left to match -- neither regular characters nor the trailing empty string -- so the process stops.

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Imagine you are the regex engine. You have been instructed to match anything, so you start at "F", you see that you can add "o" and still match, you see that you can add "o" and still match, there are no more characters to match so you complete the match, the g option causes you to see if there is another match after the first, so you look at the empty string that is left. The empty string matches, so you return it and then stop. –  Chas. Owens Aug 24 '09 at 19:40
1  
@Chas. I'm probably being dense, but why wouldn't the /g option have the same effect on the first two examples? –  FMc Aug 24 '09 at 19:48
    
Yes, it does, but because the first example is anchored at the start of the string the empty string at the end can't match (and is therefore not returned). In the second case, the match requires the existence of at least one character in the match, so it can't match an empty string. –  Chas. Owens Aug 24 '09 at 20:11
1  
Unanchored zero-or-more matches are generally confusing until you get the hang of them: perl -le 'print for "ababa" =~ /a*/g', Here we get six matches, one for the first a, then another for the empty string between the a and the b. Then the second a, then another empty string. Finally it will match the third a, and then the empty string between the a and the end of the string. This is why it is generally a bad idea to have unanchored zero-or-more matches. –  Chas. Owens Aug 24 '09 at 20:30
1  
The reason we need the match-empty-string behavior is more apparent when we look at "aa" =~ /a.*a/. In order for this to match, the first a must match the first a, the second a must match the second a, and the .* must match the empty string between them. A string (as seen by the regex engine) is really just a list of characters separated by empty strings and the regex /ab/ matches an a followed by an empty string, followed by a b. –  Chas. Owens Aug 24 '09 at 20:37

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