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How can I make a function that will create a list, increasing the amount of numbers it contains each time to a specified value?

For example if the max was 4, the list would contain

1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 4

It's difficult to explain what I'm looking for, but from the example I think you'll understand!

Thanks

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closed as not a real question by Mark, Martijn Pieters, RivieraKid, Guvante, CJM Nov 5 '12 at 23:38

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

7  
Ok, what have you tried? –  Rohit Jain Nov 5 '12 at 16:25
    
Well you have to keep track of the number of calls to this function. You can either do that with a global variable, or a static variable that you pass in the function and increment after calling it each time. –  Florin Stingaciu Nov 5 '12 at 16:26
    
do you want f(2) -> [1, 2, 2]? –  Useless Nov 5 '12 at 16:28
2  
I did not understand the question actually)) –  alexvassel Nov 5 '12 at 16:29
5  
...With no examples tried, I feel like we just did the OP's homework... –  Izkata Nov 5 '12 at 21:03
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8 Answers

up vote 16 down vote accepted

A Nested loop. This would be a very basic way to do it. There are much better ways, this should give you the general idea.

>>> def listmaker(num):
    l = []
    for i in xrange(1, num+1):
        for j in xrange(i):
            l.append(i)
    return l

>>> print listmaker(4)
[1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 4]

Here is doing it with list comprehension:

>>> def listmaker2(num):
    return [y for z in [[x]*(x) for x in xrange(1, num+1)] for y in z]

>>> print listmaker2(4)
[1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 4]

Using extend as suggested.

>>> def listmaker3(num):
    l = []
    for i in xrange(1, num+1):
        l.extend([i]*(i))
    return l

>>> print listmaker3(4)
[1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 4]
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why not using "extend"? it should reduce the complexity if final data doesn't need to be sorted –  luke14free Nov 5 '12 at 16:51
    
@luke14free i dont understand where exactly in my code you would want me to do that. a different solution could use extend, maybe i'll write one. –  Inbar Rose Nov 5 '12 at 16:55
    
@luke14free -- There's nothing in the problem statement to imply that the final data doesn't need to be sorted though. Granted, you could do l.extend([i]*i) with for i in xrange(1,num+1) as the outer loop. –  mgilson Nov 5 '12 at 16:55
    
@mgilson thanks for reminding me i can set xrange to start at 1. gonna edit. –  Inbar Rose Nov 5 '12 at 16:59
1  
@InbarRose -- You could add that to your original answer as well to avoid an unnecessary null loop. –  mgilson Nov 5 '12 at 17:01
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I'd use itertools.chain:

itertools.chain(*([i] * i for i in range(1, 5)))

or itertools.chain.from_iterable to do it slightly more lazily:

itertools.chain.from_iterable([i] * i for i in range(1, 5))

And for the ultimate laziness, pair with itertools.repeat -- (using xrange in you're using python2.x):

import itertools as it
it.chain.from_iterable(it.repeat(i, i) for i in range(1, 5))

As a function:

def lazy_funny_iter(n):
    return it.chain.from_iterable(it.repeat(i, i) for i in range(1, n+1))

def lazy_funny_list(n):
    return list(lazy_funny_iter(n))
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+1 Depending on what the asker wants, you could also replace the range with itertools.count() since you're doing everything lazily. –  Neil G Nov 5 '12 at 17:36
    
@NeilG -- Thanks for the upvote. count seems like it would be tricky to use here. My impression is that it counts indefinitely -- which would make it pretty hard to chain with other things. xrange is lazy in py2k, and range is lazy in py3k, so there really shouldn't be a problem with getting a lazy range-like function. –  mgilson Nov 5 '12 at 19:30
    
Yeah, I was just thinking that if the consumer of the sequence is zipping it with a finite sequence then counting indefinitely saves the caller having to pass the parameter. –  Neil G Nov 5 '12 at 21:32
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You can use a recursive function:

def my_func(x):
    if x <= 0:
        return []
    else:
        return my_func(x-1) + [x] * x

>>> my_func(4)
[1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 4]
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In [1]: def funny_list(n):
   ...:     return sum(([i]*i for i in range(1, n+1)), [])
   ...: 

In [2]: funny_list(4)
Out[2]: [1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 4]

This can't be turned into a real generator, though, unlike itertools.chain, which is the canonical way to go.

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2  
Interesting use of sum –  user1012451 Nov 5 '12 at 16:29
4  
One thing to beware of when using sum this way is that it will show quadratic behaviour, and so if n is (say) 100 it'll take hundreds of times longer than itertools.chain. Often that doesn't matter, of course. –  DSM Nov 5 '12 at 16:37
    
@DSM Ah. Yes. sum each array :) –  user1012451 Nov 5 '12 at 21:21
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Different perspective to the problem (a bit less complex):

>>> a = range(1,5)
>>> for i in range(2,5):
...     a.extend(range(i,5))
... 
>>> print sorted(a) #Remove the sort if you don't need it
[1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 4]
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A fairly direct way of creating a list as shown is via

[i for i in range(1,n+1) for j in range(i)]

where n is the largest number to appear in the list. The above is equivalent to the methods used in several previously suggested answers, but slightly cleaner in expression.

An alternative to all the methods mentioned so far is to note that the ith element of the list is approximately equal to the integer part of the square root of 2*i. With slight adjustments, this makes a fairly simple generator possible, as follows.

def gen_nnlist(nmax):
    n = 1
    while n < nmax*(nmax+1):
        yield int(n**.5+.5)
        n += 2

Here is some sample output from exercising the code in the python 2.7.3 interpreter:

>>> print [i for i in gen_nnlist(4)]
[1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 4]
>>> print [i for i in gen_nnlist(6)]
[1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 4, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6]
>>> fun = gen_nnlist(3)
>>> for i in fun: print i
... 
1
2
2
3
3
3
>>>
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+1 for the cleanest answer here. surprisingly, I had no idea that list comps could be nested in a flat way like this. That's kind of cool, although I'm sure I'll forget which loop is inside and which loop is outside ... –  mgilson Nov 5 '12 at 20:42
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>>> list(''.join([str(x) * x for x in range(1, 5)]))
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I'd go with a generator:

>>> def growingSeq(maxN):
...     for n in range(1,maxN+1):
...         for _ in range(n):
...             yield n
... 
>>> growingSeq(4)
<generator object growingSeq at 0x1004db280>
>>> list(growingSeq(4))
[1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 4]
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if we really want generator, go full speed with syntax xrange rather than range. –  user1012451 Nov 5 '12 at 21:22
    
In most actual use cases, the ease of typing and reading range instead of xrange will save more time than the runtime difference between the two. Plus Python 3. –  Russell Borogove Nov 5 '12 at 22:16
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