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I'm getting a data feed which is in JSON format and the only available format. In PHP, I'm using json_decode to decode the JSON, but it was breaking, and I found out that the JSON was generated in some places with double quotes in a person's nick name. I verified this using: http://jsonformatter.curiousconcept.com

I don't have control over the creation of the data, but I have to deal with this broken format when it occurs. This data after it's parsed will be put into a MySQL TABLE.

For example:

"contact1": "David "Dave" Letterman",

json_decode would return a NULL. If I manually saved the file, and changed it to single quotes around the nickname of Dave, then everything worked.

$json_string = file_get_contents($json_download);
$json_array = json_decode($json_string, true);

How do I fix the broken JSON format in json_string before it gets processed by json_decode? What should be done to pre-process the file, backslash the double quotes of the nickname? Or change them to single quotes? Is it even a good idea to store double quotes like this in MySQL?

I don't know when this might occur with each data feed, so I don't want to just check for contact1 if it has inner double quotes to fix them. Is there a way in PHP to take a line such as the above example, and backslash everything after the colon except the outer double quotes? Thanks!

This is the correct code for as provided by tftd:

<?php
// This:
// "contact1": "David "Dave" Letterman",
// Needs to look like this to be decoded by JSON:
// "contact1": "David \"Dave\" Letterman",

$data ='"contact1": "David "Dave" Letterman",';
function replace($match){
    $key = trim($match[1]);
    $val = trim($match[2]);

    if($val[0] == '"')
        $val = '"'.addslashes(substr($val, 1, -1)).'"';
    else if($val[0] == "'")
        $val = "'".addslashes(substr($val, 1, -1))."'";

    return $key.": ".$val;
}
$preg = preg_replace_callback("#([^{:]*):([^,}]*)#i",'replace',$data);
var_dump($preg);
$json_array = json_decode($preg);
var_dump($json_array);
echo $json_array . "\n";
echo $preg . "\n";
?>

Here is the output:

string(39) ""contact1": "David \"Dave\" Letterman","
NULL

"contact1": "David \"Dave\" Letterman",
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10  
Can you contact the company that owns the feed and tell them how stupid they are? –  SLaks Nov 5 '12 at 17:05
    
Yes, I can, but then I won't have them as a client anymore. :-) –  Edward Nov 5 '12 at 17:06
    
You could word it a bit nicer, but yea. Fixing 'escaping' issues is not something you want to do. It's sometimes even impossible since there can be multiple acceptable interpretations. –  Halcyon Nov 5 '12 at 17:07
1  
Explain the GIGO principal to them, then explain that you can fix their data on the fly, but your billables will go up by 50,000% to hire the staff to do it. –  Marc B Nov 5 '12 at 17:09
    
If they are you're client it should not be a big deal to inform them that they have an error in their system. Software bugs exist, pointing one out should not be reason for you to lose a client. Present this in terms of this being an issue they should address internally, but if they don't you will need to conduct extra work at extra cost in order to fix the data source on your end. –  Mike Brant Nov 5 '12 at 17:09
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As others have already pointed out, it's best if you tell your client for the problem with the JSON formatting. Ask them to send a bugreport to the original developer/company so they could fix it. If he/they can't fix it - then offer your solution. You simply need to addslashes the string before you json_encode it.

If for some reason you end up having to fix the formatting, here is a way that might work for you:

$data = '"contact1": "David "Dave" Letterman", "contact2": "Peter "Robert" Smith",{\'test\': \'working "something"\'}';
function replace($match){
    $key = trim($match[1]);
    $val = trim($match[2]);

    if($val[0] == '"')
        $val = '"'.addslashes(substr($val, 1, -1)).'"';
    else if($val[0] == "'")
        $val = "'".addslashes(substr($val, 1, -1))."'";

    return $key.": ".$val;
}
$preg = preg_replace_callback("#([^{:]*):([^,}]*)#i",'replace',$data);
var_dump($preg);
// string '"contact1": "David \"Dave\" Letterman", "contact2": "Peter \"Robert\" Smith",{'test': 'working \"something\"'}' (length=110)

Keep in mind this may break if somebody messes with the json format again.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the code. I get a different answer running this: string(74) "{"contact1": David \"Dave\" Letterman, "contact2": Peter \"Robert\" Smith}" Your example has single quotes surrounding it while when I run your code on my system which is CentOS with PHP 5.3.3 is has double quotes. –  Edward Nov 5 '12 at 19:31
    
Can you give me your JSON code before you run the code? –  tftd Nov 5 '12 at 20:20
    
P.S. I've edited the code. See if this would work. –  tftd Nov 5 '12 at 20:31
1  
I've edited my code again. Hopefully this time it works as you need it to. –  tftd Nov 5 '12 at 22:30
1  
Glad I could help :) –  tftd Nov 5 '12 at 23:36
show 4 more comments

As other people have said, you can do a search and replace, but the hard part is going to be creating your fuzzy matching rules, because in order to parse it, you will need to assume some things. Probably, you will need to assume either:

1a) Keys don't contain colons
1b) or key quotes are properly escaped
and
2a) Values don't contain commas
2b) or values have properly escaped quotes.

Even then, you might get into situations where your parsing gets confused, and it gets worse if they have comments their JSON. (Not conforming, but very common.)

Now, depending on the data, you can use newlines to decide when you're looking at a new key, but again, that's not reliable and you start making big assumptions.

So, long story short you either have to make some assumptions that might be made wrong at any time, or you need to get them to fix the data.

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Tell them to escape their strings before output. You can even offer to fix it or provide the code solution.

Otherwise you can use preg_replace with a regex expression

See Replacing specified double quotes in text with preg_replace

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