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I have a textfile containing thousands of entries like:

@INBOOK{Abu-Lughod1991,
  chapter = {Writing against culture},
  pages = {137-162},
  title = {Recapturing anthropology},
  publisher = {School of American Research Press},
  year = {1991},
  editor = {Richard Fox},
  author = {Abu-Lughod, Lila},
  address = {Santa Fe /NM},
  abstract = {Im Zusammenhang mit der Debatte um die writing culture fomuliert AL
        eine feministische Kritik und zeigt, wie von dort doch Anregungen
        für die Reflektion der Schreibweise und Repräsentation gekommen sind.*},
  crossref = {Rabinow1986},
  keywords = {Frauen; Feminismus; Erzählung als EG; Repräsentation; Roman; Schreibtechnik;
        James Clifford; writing culture; Dialog;},
  owner = {xko},
  systematik1 = {Anth\theor\Ethnographie},
  systematik2 = {Anth\theor\Text & Ges},
  timestamp = {1995-12-02}
}

I will replace all semicolons in the keywords - field to comma. But only in the keywords field - other fields should be untouched:

keywords = {Frauen, Feminismus, Erzählung als EG, Repräsentation, Roman, Schreibtechnik, James Clifford, writing culture, Dialog,},

I'm not a programmer and maybe the following code-snippet is a good starting point and i would really appreciate if someone could complete it.

outfile = open("literatur_comma.txt", "w") 
for line in open("literatur_semicolon.txt", "r"): 
    if line  # starts with "keywords" replace all semicolon with comma
        outfile.write(line) # write in new file
outfile.close() 

Thanks a lot!

EDIT: Thanks for all your answers and codes, that's great! I did a mistake in my thoughts and if i use my code-wrapper (with outfile), then it creates a new file with the keywords in it. How can i use the same file and replaces only the semicolons to comma in keywords line?

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Your keywords spans multiple lines if this is a Bibtex file (which it looks like). Is that the case in your actual file as well? If that's the case, it makes the problem significantly more complicated. –  mgilson Nov 5 '12 at 17:08
1  
Is there a reason you want this in Python specifically? It's a fine language but if you over-constrain the question you may not get the best answers. –  Jamey Sharp Nov 5 '12 at 17:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Something like this works for a single line.

if line.strip().startswith('keywords'):
    line = line.replace(';',',')
outfile.write(line) 

If keywords spans multiple lines in your actual text file though, this won't get the job done.

share|improve this answer
    
@johnthexiii -- I have a feeling that this is heading toward a somewhat complicated regex to handle the line wrapping inside the curly braces. –  mgilson Nov 5 '12 at 17:15
    
if i use this code, then it creates a new file with the keywords. How can i use the same file and replaces only the semicolons to comma in keywords line? –  StandardNerd Nov 6 '12 at 8:29
    
The typical way is to create a new file and then use shutil.move to move the new file on top of the old file. It could be done in place since you're replacing 1 character with another, but that's a much more difficult problem. –  mgilson Nov 6 '12 at 11:35
outfile = open("literatur_comma.txt", "w") 
for line in open("literatur_semicolon.txt", "r"): 
    if line.startswith('keywords'):  # starts with "keywords" replace all semicolon with comma
        outfile.write(line.replace(';',',')) # write in new file
outfile.close() 
share|improve this answer
    
how can i avoid to write in new file and just replace the semicolon in original file? –  StandardNerd Nov 6 '12 at 8:53

using pyparsing

Note: this is one way to do it, but brain isn't in parsing mode - so this is an idea rather than a proper answer... It certainly needs some work, but might well be the right direction...

A somewhat messy example of using pyparsing... (could be much nicer, with some @INBOOK and wotsit checking and parsing, but anyway...)

from pyparsing import *

keywords = originalTextFor(Keyword('keywords') + '=')
values = delimitedList(Regex('[^;}]+'), ';')
values.setParseAction(lambda L: ', '.join(L))

Where text is your example:

>>> print values.transformString(text)
@INBOOK{Abu-Lughod1991,
  chapter = {Writing against culture},
  pages = {137-162},
  title = {Recapturing anthropology},
  publisher = {School of American Research Press},
  year = {1991},
  editor = {Richard Fox},
  author = {Abu-Lughod, Lila},
  address = {Santa Fe /NM},
  abstract = {Im Zusammenhang mit der Debatte um die writing culture fomuliert AL
        eine feministische Kritik und zeigt, wie von dort doch Anregungen
        für die Reflektion der Schreibweise und Repräsentation gekommen sind.*},
  crossref = {Rabinow1986},
  keywords = {Frauen, Feminismus, Erzählung als EG, Repräsentation, Roman, Schreibtechnik, James Clifford, writing culture, Dialog;},
  owner = {xko},
  systematik1 = {Anth   heor\Ethnographie},
  systematik2 = {Anth   heor\Text & Ges},
  timestamp = {1995-12-02}
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