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public class EqualsTest {
  public static <T> boolean equalTest(T o1, T o2) {
      return o1.equals(o2);
  }
  public static void main(String[] args) {
      EqualsTest et1 = new EqualsTest();
      EqualsTest et2 = new EqualsTest();
      System.out.println(et1.equals(et2));
      System.out.println(equalTest(et1, et2));
  }
  public boolean equals(Object o) {
      if (o instanceof EqualsTest) {
          System.out.println("equals(Object)");
          return true;
      }
      return false;
  }
  public boolean equals(EqualsTest et) {
      System.out.println("equals(EqualsTest)");
      return this.equals((Object)et);
  }
}
share|improve this question

closed as too localized by djechlin, RivieraKid, brimborium, Kyle Trauberman, Andy Hayden Nov 6 '12 at 0:40

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
The answer to this question could have been found by simply googling "java constructor" – Azzi Nov 5 '12 at 17:36
    
@Azzi: Googling "java constructor" won't explain to you the concept of having an implicit default constructor in this particular class... – Lukas Eder Nov 5 '12 at 21:57

11 Answers 11

up vote 14 down vote accepted

There is none, it is implicit. Since it does not explicitly extends any class, it will implicitly extend Object. And since Object has a no-arg constructor, it will implicitly call up to that one.

Really, the class could contain a constructor written as this, and it would be equivalent:

public class EqualsTest {
    public EqualsTest() {
        super();
    }

    //the methods...
}

You cannot use implicit constructors if the class you extend does not also have a 'no-arg' constructor (whether implicit or explicit). If you provide any explicit constructor, there will be no implicit no-arg constructor created for you.

share|improve this answer
    
what happens if they're implicit? – user133466 Nov 5 '12 at 17:12

There is no constructor defined in the class so Java will add a Default Constructor on compilation . Check http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Default_constructor#Java_and_C.23

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There is no explicit constructor in your class. You are using the implicit constructor from Object class in the statements as below:

  EqualsTest et1 = new EqualsTest();

For your understanding, constructor are normally defined as below:

  public EqualsTest(){ //without param
  }


  public EqualsTest(int param1){ //with one param
  }

Please note: The primary differentiation in the constructor and other methods is: Constructor has same name as your class and doesn't have any return type.

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If you don't specify any constructor, one it is provided. If you provide one, you have to override the one which is by default. So here you have provided constructor.

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If a class does not have any constructors it creates an implicit one, in your case

public EqualsTest(){}

will be there. If you create a constructor which takes any parameters you will lose this implicit constructor, and if you want a no argument constructor you will have to construct it.

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1  
The implicit constructor makes one call: super() – Azzi Nov 5 '12 at 17:40

The main method is the entry point to your application. It is invoked when you start it up and there is no instantiation here. You can create a constructor if you want:

public class Main {
    /**
     * Main.
     * @param args
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Main main = new Main();
        // do something more
    }

    public Main() {
        // do something
    }
}

and you can even instantiate Main as you can see in my code. In this case you can create a constructor for Main otherwise Object's default constructor will be called.

You can even do this it makes sense to you:

public class Main {
    /**
     * Main.
     * @param args
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Main main = new Main("some param");
    }

    public Main() {
        // do something
    }

    public Main(String someParameter) {
        this();
    }

}

but keep in mind that without your intervention your Main class won't get instantiated.

share|improve this answer

If not specified, the constructor is implicit.

That means you can instantiate that class by calling new EqualsTest().

When instead you define a constructor with arguments, you lose this feature, and you are forced to write the code for the default, no-arg constructor too, if needed.

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Java provides a default constructor which takes no arguments and performs no special actions or initializations, when no explicit constructors are provided.

The only action taken by the implicit default constructor is to call the superclass constructor using the super() call.

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An implicit constructor is there in your case which is calling the object class constructor

implicit constructo look like

public  EqualsTest()
{
 super();
}
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If no constructor is specified there is an implicit constructor. In your case

 public EqualsTest(){
     super();
 }

If you declare a constructor this implicit one is not present any more and you would have to explicitly declare a no args constructor

share|improve this answer

All java classes without an explicitly declared constructor get a default no-arg constructor of the form

public ClassName()
{
  super();
}

Inside the implicit constructor is a call to the constructor of the superclass of your class (Object by default), hence the 'super();'

share|improve this answer
    
The implicit constructor makes one call: super() – Azzi Nov 5 '12 at 17:41

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