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For some reason, I notice that I end up using a lot of finite state machines at work. In particular, when I'm implementing a custom TCP/serial protocol, they are very helpful and produce a very robust output (in my opinion).

My days in CS classes are long behind me. As such my recollection of the stuff I learned there is fuzzy. I was curious if there are other concepts people are leveraging that I've forgotten about.

There is no "right" answer. Vote up the answers containing the concept you use this most. We'll simply end up with the most used concepts on top. For me, it'll be a list of stuff to study up on.

-Robert

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This is turning into a overly general / highly subjective "what are the best computer development practices?" question - should be closed. –  DJ. Aug 24 '09 at 19:53
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Also sounds very familiar to this: stackoverflow.com/questions/747292/…. I gather the ones people "apply the most" are not all that different than the ones they would suggest you "should know". –  gnovice Aug 24 '09 at 20:36
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@d03boy - then its a dup of stackoverflow.com/questions/747292/… –  DJ. Aug 25 '09 at 19:13

44 Answers 44

up vote 32 down vote accepted

Strive for low coupling, high cohesion.

low coupling, high cohesion

(I stole this image from the website linked above)

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I only wish that EVERY software developer understood the importance of this principle. –  Jagd Aug 24 '09 at 20:02
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Lovely Kabbalistic tree of life diagram you have there. –  chaos Aug 24 '09 at 20:08
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What package did you use to make that graph? +1 for bringing up decoupling. –  Torlack Aug 24 '09 at 20:19
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I never learned this in school, but +1 –  Martin Aug 24 '09 at 23:18
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The graph was done using a Sharpie marker on a yellow legal pad. –  Sammy Larbi Sep 7 '09 at 18:55

Keep it simple. If possible, make it simpler.

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.. but not any more simple. –  PoorLuzer Aug 24 '09 at 17:50
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Is this a CS Concept?? –  DJ. Aug 24 '09 at 19:14
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Hide complexity != simple –  DJ. Aug 24 '09 at 19:58

Model View Controller pattern is the one I use more so than any other.

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Or, perhaps more generally, a separation of concerns. MVC is really just a well-formed extension of that concept. –  Matt Aug 24 '09 at 18:07

Big O notation

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Big zero? :) –  Stephan202 Aug 24 '09 at 17:43
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Just to clarify - Big O is not a complexity class, but rather a notation with mathematical significance... –  Yuval Adam Aug 24 '09 at 19:41

Copying and Modifying Existing Code.

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How true, yet funny at a superficial level. –  PoorLuzer Aug 24 '09 at 17:49

Breaking down a problem into smaller sub-problems, I think, is something I quite often do, even if not really thinking about it :

  • it helps getting to the solution
  • and it also help getting cleaner code (smaller functions / methods, that do "unit stuff", for instance)

Still, maybe it's not really a "concept"... Event if I remember some algorithm lessons where we were taught "divide to conquer" ^^


If you want something more concrete, I'd go with :

  • testing ; it's something we don't do when we are just out of school... And we learn the hard way that it's definitly something we have to do more, and better !
  • Some Design Patterns, probably
  • Thinking before coding -- maybe the most important thing in our jobs ^^
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Object Oriented Programming and Data Structure

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Don't repeat yourself.

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I must have missed that class... –  DJ. Aug 24 '09 at 19:23
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Hey, I think I took that class twice. –  NVRAM Aug 24 '09 at 23:45

Time/Space complexity.

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Concurrency and parallel computing. I didn't touch it for many years, but it's become more relevant with each passing year (and each core count doubling).

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Abstraction

Aho and Ullman write in the introduction to Foundations of Computer Science

But fundamentally, computer science is a science of abstraction — creating the right model for thinking about a problem and devising the appropriate mechanizable techniques to solve it.

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Singleton, template and strategy patterns.

Also: YAGNI - You ain't gonna need it
KISS - Keep it simple, stupid

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The "Google" concept ;)

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You must make a nice arbitrary-precision math library if you routinely calculate numbers in the googol (10,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,‌​000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000) range. –  Chris Lutz Aug 24 '09 at 19:07
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You found a bug. 10,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,0‌​00,000,000,000,000,00010,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,‌​000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,00010,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000‌​,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,00010,000,000,000,00‌​0,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000‌​,000 –  Jon Aug 24 '09 at 19:23

Estimating space/time complexity and using appropriate data structures to get much simpler/faster code. Modeling certain problems as graphs also came useful once in a while.

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Avoiding premature optimizations, as Mr Knuth said:

"We should forget about small efficiencies, say about 97% of the time: premature optimization is the root of all evil." (from wikipedia)

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Requirements analysis and relational databases.

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Encapsulation or information hidding

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"Debugging code is twice as hard as writing it. Therefore, if you write code as cleverly as you can, you are by definition not clever enough to debug it."

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"Any problem in computer science can be solved with another layer of indirection." — David Wheeler, chief programmer for the EDSAC project in the early 1950s

When well-applied, this leads to reasonable generalization as seen in examples such as abstract data types, reusable classes with virtual methods, etc.

When poorly-applied, it leads to overly-indirect implementations with lots of runtime overhead due to over-generalization, e.g. the Intel 432 architecture.

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Garbage in, garbage out.

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Object Oriented Programming

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It's not CS-specific, but just remember that producing results that are simple or concise are both good goals. If you can produce something simple and concise then you're likely producing high-quality work.

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Understanding and utilizing the data structures and algorithms provided for me by language libraries (either from the standard or third parties, like Boost). Don't reinvent the wheel, and learn what wheels are out there that are better than your own.

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Problem solving...

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Coupling and cohesion.

It's essentially the divide-and-conquer paradigm the basis of all software.

You are looking for orthogonal concepts and orthogonal software entities, those that exhibit loose coupling and high cohesion.

Used a gosub in Basic? You're using C&C.

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These are the university courses/concepts I found most useful for my professional career

  • Introduction to Databases
  • DBMS - how they're working
  • Algorithms and Data structures
  • Object Oriented Programming concepts
  • Design patterns (mostly MVC, application layering)
  • Requirements engineering
  • Software Quality Management
  • Software Metrics

guess they're all...I did not mention specific technologies here but just the concepts.

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The longer a fault exists in software the more costly it is to detect and correct the less likely it is to be properly corrected

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