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I am working on a picture editing tool in which I need to merge two images. Most of the image editing tools like gimp use PorterDuff modes for merging or blending images. I am also using the same approach in android.
As android provides limited number of PorterDuff modes, I am not able to achieve the desired result. So, I am thinking of implementing PorterDuff modes(Overlapping, Hard-Light, Soft-Light, Color-burn, Color-dodge) which are not included in android.
The problem is I don't know where to start. So, any reference or guidance in this regard will be highly appreciated.

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I don't have a good answer for you and I suspect that there is none. The modes are handled in the SKIA library which is in C++. You would have to change it, recompile and include in your project or, include it in a custom version of Android, neither of which are attractive propositions. code.google.com/p/skia/source/browse/trunk/src/core/…, skia.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/include/core/SkXfermode.h The Android SDK classes are little more than enums and thin wrappers around SKIA. –  Simon Nov 5 '12 at 17:38
    
I think what can be done in C++ can also be done in Java, the only issue will be the speed. Thanks for the links. I will go through them. –  karn Nov 5 '12 at 19:45
    
@Simon thanks for the links. I needed to know the maths behind PorterDuff modes and the links gave the full explanation of it. I implemented the Overlay mode and it's working perfectly. I am adding the answer so that other can use it. –  karn Nov 6 '12 at 10:39
    
Great, glad to have helped. –  Simon Nov 6 '12 at 10:43

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This is how you can implement the Overlay PorterDuff mode in android:

public class MyPorterDuffMode
{

    public Bitmap applyOverlayMode(Bitmap srcBmp, Bitmap destBmp)
    {
        int width = srcBmp.getWidth();
        int height = srcBmp.getHeight();
        int srcPixels[] = new int[width * height];;
        int destPixels[] = new int[width * height];
        int resultPixels[] = new int[width * height];
        int aS = 0, rS = 0, gS = 0, bS = 0;
        int rgbS = 0;
        int aD = 0, rD = 0, gD = 0, bD = 0;
        int rgbD = 0;

        try
        {
            srcBmp.getPixels(srcPixels, 0, width, 0, 0, width, height);
            destBmp.getPixels(destPixels, 0, width, 0, 0, width, height);
            srcBmp.recycle();
            destBmp.recycle();
        }
        catch(IllegalArgumentException e)
        {
        }
        catch(ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException e)
        {
        }

        for(int y = 0; y < height; y++)
        {
            for(int x = 0; x < width; x++)
            {
                rgbS = srcPixels[y*width + x];
                aS = (rgbS >> 24) & 0xff;
                rS = (rgbS >> 16) & 0xff;
                gS = (rgbS >>  8) & 0xff;
                bS = (rgbS      ) & 0xff;

                rgbD = destPixels[y*width + x];
                aD = ((rgbD >> 24) & 0xff);
                rD = (rgbD >> 16) & 0xff;
                gD = (rgbD >>  8) & 0xff;
                bD = (rgbD      )  & 0xff;

                //overlay-mode
                rS = overlay_byte(rD, rS, aS, aD);
                gS = overlay_byte(gD, gS, aS, aD);
                bS = overlay_byte(bD, bS, aS, aD);
                aS = aS + aD - Math.round((aS * aD)/255f);

                resultPixels[y*width + x] = ((int)aS << 24) | ((int)rS << 16) | ((int)gS << 8) | (int)bS;
            }
        }

        return Bitmap.createBitmap(resultPixels, width, height, srcBmp.getConfig());
    }



    // kOverlay_Mode
    int overlay_byte(int sc, int dc, int sa, int da) {
        int tmp = sc * (255 - da) + dc * (255 - sa);
        int rc;
        if (2 * dc <= da) {
            rc = 2 * sc * dc;
        } else {
            rc = sa * da - 2 * (da - dc) * (sa - sc);
        }
        return clamp_div255round(rc + tmp);
    }


    int clamp_div255round(int prod) {
        if (prod <= 0) {
            return 0;
        } else if (prod >= 255*255) {
            return 255;
        } else {
            return Math.round((float)prod/255);
        }
    }

}

Note: While extracting the bitmaps set the configuration to be ARGB_8888 and this is important.
Any time you want to do image blending or color manipulation, you need to make sure you are in ARGB_8888 mode, not in RGB_565 mode. Up until 2.3, android will usully default to RGB_565 mode unless you explicitly tell it to do otherwise in order to save memory.

BitmapFactory.Options opt = new BitmapFactory.Options();
opt.inPreferredConfig = Config.ARGB_8888;
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How do you apply this? I see these sorts of options: myPaint.setColorFilter(new PorterDuffColorFilter(Color.RED, Mode.MULTIPLY)); and myPaint.setXfermode(new PorterDuffXfermode(Mode.SCREEN)); I want to make a soft-light blend mode but am not sure how to apply it once I've worked out the math. –  Allison Apr 10 at 18:34
    
When u use default android api for blending bitmaps then u first draw the destination bitmap and then draw the source bitmap with paint set to desired Porterduff mode. Here I have created custom porterduff mode so I cannot use this method. I just send the two bitmaps which need to be blended to my method where I manipulate each pixels and finally return the blended bitmap. I have done the same in above example. Check the method : public Bitmap applyOverlayMode(Bitmap srcBmp, Bitmap destBmp) –  karn Apr 14 at 7:31

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