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In the Apple block documentation is an example of code not to write:

void dontDoThisEither() {
  void (^block) (void);
  int i = random();
  if (i > 1000) {
    block = ^{printf("got i at: %d\n", i); };
  }
  // ...
}

The comments for the code say the block literal scope is the "then" clause. I don't understand what they mean by that, there is no then clause, which is presumably why they have put it in quotes. But why have they put it in quotes and what is the relationship to the block's scope?

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"then" clause means the part inside the {} after if (i > 1000). In an if statement, the statement/block when condition is true can be called then-clause, and the statement/block when the condition is false can be called else-clause. –  nhahtdh Nov 5 '12 at 17:37
    
could you post the link to the docs that say this? –  jere Nov 5 '12 at 17:38
    

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Think of an if statement as: if this then that else this other thing

The {... block = ...} is in the then that part of the if statement. That is, it is *a sub-scope of the scope of the dontDoThisEither() function.

Because blocks are created on the stack and are only valid within the scope of their declaration, that means that the block assignment in that example is only valid within the then that scope of the if statement.

I.e. Consider:

void dontDoThisEither() {
  void (^block) (void);
  int i = random();
  if (i > 1000) {
    block = ^{printf("got i at: %d\n", i); };
  }  else {
    block = ^{printf("your number is weak and small. ignored.\n");};
  }
  block();
}

At the time block(); is executed the block that it is pointing to is in a scope that is no longer valid and the behavior will be undefined (and likely crashy in a real world example).

share|improve this answer
    
then how would you conditionally assign something to a block? –  jere Nov 5 '12 at 17:49
    
copy the block in the inner scope and release it when you are done with it. –  bbum Nov 5 '12 at 18:13
1  
Note this answers changes under ARC - the variable block is strong and the assignment to it causes a retain which under ARC causes the block to be copied from the stack to the heap. So dontDoThisEither is valid under ARC. [Confirmed in Xcode 4.4.1] –  CRD Nov 5 '12 at 20:28

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