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I want to refactor my user schema. The main reason for this decision is that I do not want to worry about password and salt generation. So I would like to move the encoding logic from the pre save handler to a setter. Unfortunately I do not have access from a setter to other properties of the object (like salt).

So defaulting a salt does not work and encoding a password with a salt also not.

My current implementation is:

var userSchema = new mongoose.Schema({

    username: { 
        type: String, 
        index: { unique: true, sparse: true }, 
        required: true, lowercase: true, trim: true
    },

    email: {
        type: String,
        index: { unique: true, sparse: true }, 
        required: true, lowercase: true, trim: true
    },

    salt: {
        type: String,
        select: false
    },

    password: {
        type: String,
        select: false
    },

    plainPassword: {
        type: String,
        select: false
    }

});

// FIXME: password encoding only on change, not always
userSchema.pre('save', function(next) {
    // check if a plainPassword was set
    if (this.plainPassword !== '') {
        // generate salt
        crypto.randomBytes(64, function(err, buf) {
            if (err) return next(err);
            this.salt = buf.toString('base64');
            // encode password
            crypto.pbkdf2(this.plainPassword, this.salt, 25000, 512, function(err, encodedPassword) {
                if (err) return next(err);
                this.password = new Buffer(encodedPassword, 'binary').toString('base64');
                this.plainPassword = '';
            }.bind(this));
        }.bind(this));
    }

    next();
});

// statics
userSchema.methods.hasEqualPassword = function(plainPassword, cb) {
    crypto.pbkdf2(plainPassword, this.salt, 25000, 512, function(err, encodedPassword) {
        if (err) return next(err);
        encodedPassword = new Buffer(encodedPassword, 'binary').toString('base64');
        cb((this.password === encodedPassword));
    }.bind(this));
}

module.exports = mongoose.model('User', userSchema, 'Users');

Has somebody managed to move encryption to mongoose setters?

Regards, bodo

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You DO have access to other properties from within the setter with the use of the this keyword. For example:

userSchema.path('pass').set(function(v) {

  console.log(this); // Returns model instance

  return v;

});

However, setters are unfit for your use case. As you probably know, HMAC-SHA1 is super expensive and therefore will block unless performed asynchronously. Mongoose setters require the function to return a value and there is no way to route the result of crypto.pbkdf2()'s callback to the return value of the setter function. This is a limitation of asynchronous javascript and not Mongoose itself: you can't wrap an async call within a sync function, as this destroys the nature of the async chain.

Setters are most widely used for simple string manipulations and data sanitization.

Here is a demo for encryption using only instance methods:

// Model method
userSchema.methods.hashPassword = function(pass, callback) {
  // Generate salt (this should probably be async too)
  var salt = this.salt = crypto.createHash('md5').update(Math.random().toString()).digest('hex');
  // Salt and Hash password
  crypto.pbkdf2(pass, salt, 25000, 512, callback);
});

// Implementation
var user = new User({
  email: req.body.email
});
user.hashPassword(req.body.pass, function(err, hash){
  user.pass = hash; 
  user.save();
});
share|improve this answer
    
So the only way would be the user of save event handlers or is there something else possible? –  bodokaiser Nov 6 '12 at 17:27
1  
I don't handle it with middleware, I just use instance methods. See my second answer for a demo. –  jibsales Nov 6 '12 at 17:35

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