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I’ve been having problems using multiple cursors on a single sqlite database within a nested loop. I found a solution that works for me, but it’s limited and I haven’t seen this specific problem documented online. I’m posting this so: -- A clear problem/solution is available -- To see if there’s a better solution -- Perhaps I’ve found a defect in the sqlite3 python module

Here’s the situation: My Python app is storing social relationship data in sqlite. The dataset includes a one-to-many relationship between two tables: myConnections and sharedConnections. The former has one row for each connection. The sharedConnections table has 0:N rows, depending on how many connections are shared. To build the structure, I use a nested loop. In the outside loop I visit each row in myConnections. In the inside loop, I populate the sharedConnections table. The code looks like this:

curOuter = db.cursor()  
for row in curOuter.execute('SELECT * FROM myConnections'):    
    id  = row[0]  
    curInner = db.cursor()  
    scList = retrieve_shared_connections(id)  
    for sc in scList:  
        curInner.execute('''INSERT INTO sharedConnections(IdConnectedToMe, IdShared) VALUES (?,?)''', (id,sc))  
db.commit()  

The result is odd. The sharedConnections table gets duplicate entries for the first two records in myConnections. They’re a bit collated. A’s connections, B’s connections, followed by A and then B again. After the initial stutter, the processing is correct! Example:

myConnections
-------------
a   
b  
c  
d  

sharedConnections
-------------
a->b  
a->c  
b->c  
b->d  
a->b  
a->c  
b->c  
b->d  

The solution is imperfect. Instead of using the iterator from the outside loop cursor, I SELECT, then fetchall() and loop through the resulting list. Since my dataset is pretty small, this is OK.

curOuter = db.cursor()
curOuter.execute('SELECT * FROM myConnections'):
rows = curOuter.fetchall()
for row in rows:    
    id  = row[0]
    curInner = db.cursor()
    scList = retrieve_shared_connections(id)
    for sc in scList:
        curInner.execute('''INSERT INTO sharedConnections(IdConnectedToMe, IdShared) VALUES (?,?)''', (id,sc))
db.commit()

There you have it. Using two cursors against different tables in the same sqlite database within a nested loop doesn’t seem to work. What’s more, it doesn’t fail, it just gives odd results.

So: -- Is this truly the best solution?
-- Is there a better solution?
-- Is this a defect that should be addressed?

ANSWER: At this point, the questions have been posed, there's been some discussion and I think we're pretty well complete. Here's how it seems:

  1. You cannot reliably use multiple cursors in nested loops with the sqlite3 module from python. We didn't get explicit confirmation unfortunately.
  2. There is a better solution than the one I posted. 2a: Reduce the select to the fields you need (I was using *). 2b: Structure the loops so the smallest footprint goes into memory. For this case, sharedConnections <= connections (it's a subset). So use the cursor on connections and accumulate sharedConnections in memory. 2c: Using .executemany on the accumulated list of sharedConnections should be more efficient than the .execute on the inside loop.
  3. Is this a defect? We didn't get an answer. I guess that's life!

Thanks to all for your interest and suggestions.

Best regards, -Jim

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1  
What does retrieve_shared_connections() do? Does it affect the DB in any way? –  CL. Nov 6 '12 at 7:58
    
retrieve_shared_connections(id) does not involve the database. It's a function that uses a webservice to return a list of shared connections, given an id. The loop immediate below that call INSERTs each shared connection into the database. –  tjim Nov 6 '12 at 13:06
    
I haven't looked too closely at your code yet, but would an INSERT INTO ... SELECT FROM statement work? INSERT statements in SQLite do allow the values to be culled from a SELECT statement. –  Iguananaut Nov 7 '12 at 21:42
1  
Ah I see what you're saying now. It's been a while since I've used SQLite so maybe someone with more recent experience can comment. I would have thought that because you're selecting/updating from different tables it shouldn't matter. But it appears that the act of doing inserts is confusing the generator method for your outer cursor. So using fetchall() is probably a good bet for now to get around that. However, it looks like you're only using the id column from myConnections so you can save a lot by using SELECT id from myConnections instead of all columns. –  Iguananaut Nov 8 '12 at 16:29
1  
Wow. Really? That is really lame. Does anyone know if this is a limitation of the sqlite or the python interface to it? In my case, the outter loop has ~6 million rows. I can't pull it all into memory. I can come up with some sort of work around. Perhaps an enterprise DB is the way to go (SQL Server, Postgres, MySQL, etc). –  Doo Dah May 15 '13 at 21:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could build up a list of rows to insert in the inner loop and then cursor.executemany() outside the loop. This doesn't answer the multiple cursor question but may be a workaround for you.

curOuter = db.cursor()
rows=[]
for row in curOuter.execute('SELECT * FROM myConnections'):    
    id  = row[0]    
    scList = retrieve_shared_connections(id)  
    for sc in scList:

        rows.append((id,sc))
curOuter.executemany('''INSERT INTO sharedConnections(IdConnectedToMe, IdShared) VALUES (?,?)''', rows)  
db.commit()

Better yet only select the ID from myConnections:

curOuter.execute('SELECT id FROM myConnections')
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @user1451298. A previous comment suggested replacing * with Id. Agreed. My first thought on your restructuring was "6 of one; 1/2 dozen of the other." But, after thinking through your solution it seems more extensible because the rows can be spooled to disk if memory becomes an issue - thanks! –  tjim Nov 8 '12 at 21:38
    
oh, didn't see that. Yeah, not sure if building up a cache of rows to insert is any better than pulling all the ids with fetchall()... –  Anov Nov 8 '12 at 21:42

While building an in-memory list seems to be best solution, I've found that using explicit transactions reduces the number duplicates returned in the outer query. That would make it something like:

with db:
    curOuter = db.cursor()
    for row in curOuter.execute('SELECT * FROM myConnections'):    
        id  = row[0]
        with db:
            curInner = db.cursor()  
            scList = retrieve_shared_connections(id)  
            for sc in scList:  
                curInner.execute('''INSERT INTO sharedConnections(IdConnectedToMe, IdShared) VALUES (?,?)''', (id,sc))
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