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So, I'm trying to compare two models, fit1 and fit2.

Initially, I was just doing anova(fit1,fit2), and this yielded output that I understood (including a p-value).

However, when I switched my models from lm()-based models to glm()-based models, anova(fit1,fit2) now yielded Residual Degrees of Freedom, Residuals Deviances, and Df Deviances, which I am having trouble interpreting (resources explaining these metrics seem scarce). I was hoping to extract a p-value for the comparison between the two models, but for some reason anova(fit1,fit2, test='Chisq') isn't working. Any suggestions?

I realize that, depending on the link function in my glms, Chi-squared may not be the most appropriate test, but I have used 'F' in appropriate contexts as well with similar disappointment.

Is this problem familiar to anybody else? Suggestions? Many thanks!

Example:

make_and_compare_models <- function(fitness_trait_name, data_frame_name, vector_for_multiple_regression, predictor_for_single_regression, fam){
        fit1<-glm(formula=as.formula(paste(fitness_trait_name,"~", paste(vector_for_multiple_regression, sep="+"))), family=fam, data=data_frame_name)
        print ("summary fit 1")
        print(summary(fit1))
        fit2<- glm(data=data_frame_name, formula=as.formula(paste(fitness_trait_name,"~",predictor_for_single_regression)), family=fam)

        print("summary fit 2")
        print(summary(fit2))
        print("model comparison stats:")
        mod_test<-anova(fit2,fit1)

        ##suggestion #1
        print(anova(fit2,fit1, test="Chisq"))

        #suggestion #2
        print ("significance:")
    print (1-pchisq( abs(mod_test$Deviance[2]),df=abs(mod_test$Df[2])))

        }


data<-structure(list(ID = c(1L, 2L, 4L, 7L, 9L, 10L, 12L, 13L, 14L, 
15L, 16L, 17L, 18L, 20L, 21L, 22L, 23L, 24L, 25L, 27L, 28L, 29L, 
31L, 34L, 37L, 38L, 39L, 40L, 41L, 43L, 44L, 45L, 46L, 47L, 48L, 
49L, 52L, 55L, 56L, 59L, 60L, 61L, 62L, 63L, 65L, 66L, 67L, 68L, 
69L, 71L), QnWeight_initial = c(158L, 165L, 137L, 150L, 153L, 
137L, 158L, 163L, 159L, 151L, 145L, 144L, 157L, 144L, 133L, 148L, 
151L, 151L, 147L, 158L, 178L, 164L, 134L, 151L, 148L, 142L, 127L, 
179L, 162L, 150L, 151L, 153L, 163L, 155L, 163L, 170L, 149L, 165L, 
128L, 134L, 145L, 147L, 148L, 160L, 131L, 155L, 169L, 143L, 123L, 
151L), Survived_eclosion = c(0L, 1L, 0L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 
1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 0L, 1L, 
1L, 1L, 1L, 0L, 1L, 1L, 0L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 
1L, 1L, 0L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L), Days_wrkr_eclosion_minus20 = c(NA, 
1L, NA, 3L, 0L, 2L, 0L, 1L, 0L, 0L, 0L, 1L, NA, 0L, 7L, 1L, 0L, 
1L, 0L, 1L, 2L, 2L, NA, 2L, 3L, 2L, 2L, NA, 0L, 1L, NA, NA, 0L, 
0L, 0L, 0L, 3L, 3L, 3L, 1L, 0L, 2L, NA, 1L, 0L, 1L, 1L, 3L, 1L, 
2L), MLH = c(0.5, 0.666666667, 0.555555556, 0.25, 1, 0.5, 0.333333333, 
0.7, 0.5, 0.7, 0.5, 0.666666667, 0.375, 0.4, 0.5, 0.333333333, 
0.4, 0.375, 0.3, 0.5, 0.3, 0.2, 0.4, 0.875, 0.6, 0.4, 0.222222222, 
0.222222222, 0.6, 0.6, 0.3, 0.4, 0.714285714, 0.4, 0.3, 0.6, 
0.4, 0.7, 0.625, 0.555555556, 0.25, 0.5, 0.5, 0.6, 0.25, 0.428571429, 
0.3, 0.25, 0.375, 0.555555556), Acon5 = c(0.35387674, 0.35387674, 
0.35387674, 0.35387674, 0.35387674, 0.35387674, 0.35387674, 0, 
0, 1, 0, 1, 0.35387674, 0, 0, 0.35387674, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 
0.35387674, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 
0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0.35387674), Baez = c(1, 1, 1, 0.467836257, 
1, 1, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0.467836257, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 
0, 0, 0.467836257, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 
1, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1), C294 = c(0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 
0.582542694, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 
0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0.582542694, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 
1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1), C316 = c(1, 1, 0, 0, 0.519685039, 
0.519685039, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0.519685039, 0, 
1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0.519685039, 1, 0, 1, 
1, 0, 0.519685039, 1, 0.519685039, 1, 1, 1, 0.519685039, 0.519685039, 
0, 0.519685039, 0.519685039, 0), i_120_PigTail = c(1, 1, 0, 1, 
0.631236443, 0.631236443, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0.631236443, 1, 1, 
1, 0, 0.631236443, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0.631236443, 0, 1, 
1, 0, 1, 0.631236443, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0.631236443, 0.631236443, 
0, 1, 0, 0.631236443, 0.631236443, 1, 0.631236443, 0.631236443, 
1), i129 = c(0L, 1L, 1L, 0L, 1L, 0L, 1L, 1L, 0L, 1L, 0L, 0L, 
1L, 0L, 0L, 0L, 0L, 0L, 1L, 0L, 0L, 0L, 1L, 1L, 0L, 0L, 0L, 0L, 
0L, 0L, 1L, 0L, 1L, 0L, 0L, 0L, 1L, 0L, 0L, 0L, 0L, 1L, 0L, 0L, 
0L, 0L, 0L, 0L, 0L, 0L), Jackstraw_PigTail = c(0L, 1L, 1L, 0L, 
1L, 1L, 0L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 0L, 0L, 0L, 0L, 0L, 
1L, 0L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 0L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 0L, 1L, 0L, 1L, 
0L, 1L, 1L, 0L, 1L, 1L, 0L, 0L, 0L, 0L, 0L, 0L, 0L, 0L), Neil_Young = c(0.529636711, 
0, 1, 0, 0.529636711, 0.529636711, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1, 
1, 1, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 
1, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1), Ramble = c(0, 0, 0, 
0, 0.215163934, 0.215163934, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 
0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0.215163934, 0, 
0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0.215163934, 0, 0, 0, 0), Sol_18 = c(1, 
0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 
0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 1, 0.404669261, 
1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1)), .Names = c("ID", "QnWeight_initial", 
"Survived_eclosion", "Days_wrkr_eclosion_minus20", "MLH", "Acon5", 
"Baez", "C294", "C316", "i_120_PigTail", "i129", "Jackstraw_PigTail", 
"Neil_Young", "Ramble", "Sol_18"), class = "data.frame", row.names = c(NA, 
-50L))

make_and_compare_models("QnWeight_initial", data, c("Acon5","Baez","C294","C316","i_120_PigTail","i129","Jackstraw_PigTail","Neil_Young","Ramble","Sol_18"), "MLH", "gaussian")
share|improve this question
    
anova(fit1,fit2,test="Chisq") should work, unless the nested models happen to have identical fits. Can you provide more detail? –  Ben Bolker Dec 20 '12 at 14:04
    
PS it's not the link function but the family that determines whether you should use Chi-square or F (specifically, whether the scale parameter is fixed [Poisson, binomial] or estimated [Gaussian, Gamma, quasi-likelihood fits] –  Ben Bolker Dec 20 '12 at 14:06
    
@BenBolker thanks for the clarification. Just to be sure, it Chi-square for fixed scale parameters and F for estimated? Also, the output from anova(fit1,fit2, test="Chisq") yields a Pr(<Chi) that isn't bounded by (0,1). In other words, I have no idea how to interpret values like -18.215 (there are also high positive numbers). I wish I could remember whether this was the original problem I was having with using test="Chisq", but I no longer can. –  Atticus29 Dec 20 '12 at 22:21
    
Also, is there a test="F" analogue? I can't find anything about test as a parameter for anova() in the manual... –  Atticus29 Dec 20 '12 at 22:22
    
(1) Yes, chi-square for fixed and F for estimated. (2) Can you provide a reproducible example of the pattern you're describing? It would be really helpful One confusing "feature" is that if the deviance difference is less than or approximately zero (i.e. the models are essentially identical), then R doesn't print the p-value, and what you're really seeing is the deviance difference (e.g. see @DWin's example). (3) For "F", "Chisq", etc. see ?anova.glm, which in turn references ?stat.anova. –  Ben Bolker Dec 21 '12 at 3:05
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2 Answers 2

The difference in deviance between a "larger" or more complex model and a nested or "reduced" model is distributed (asymptotically) as a chi-squared variate with the difference in degrees of freedom of the two models. So you would extract the deviance estimate and the difference in degrees of freedom and compare that to pchisq( deviance, diff(df) ). The "p-value" is just 1 minus that value.

> 1-pchisq(3.84,1)
[1] 0.05004352

If you run the first example in the glm help page and then add a reduced model without the "treatment" variable, you get:

glm.D93.o <- glm(counts ~ outcome, family=poisson())
 anova.res <-anova(glm.D93, glm.D93.o)
 anova.res
#------------
Analysis of Deviance Table

Model 1: counts ~ outcome + treatment
Model 2: counts ~ outcome
  Resid. Df Resid. Dev Df    Deviance
1         4     5.1291               
2         6     5.1291 -2 -2.6645e-15
#---------------
 str(anova.res)
Classes ‘anova’ and 'data.frame':   2 obs. of  4 variables:
 $ Resid. Df : num  4 6
 $ Resid. Dev: num  5.13 5.13
 $ Df        : num  NA -2
 $ Deviance  : num  NA -2.66e-15
 - attr(*, "heading")= chr  "Analysis of Deviance Table\n" "Model 1: counts ~ outcome + treatment\nModel 2: counts ~ outcome"

So after looking at how things were stored in the object itself, this give the p-value for "outcome":

 1-pchisq( abs(anova.res$Deviance[2]), abs(anova.res$Df[2]))
[1] 1

And this would be the corresponding procedure on the treatment+outcome model versus the treatment-only model:

> glm.D93.t <- glm(counts ~ treatment, family=poisson())
> anova.res2 <-anova(glm.D93, glm.D93.t)
> 1-pchisq( abs(anova.res2$Deviance[2]), abs(anova.res2$Df[2]))
[1] 0.06547071
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, DWin! That answers my question! –  Atticus29 Nov 5 '12 at 18:49
    
the 1-pchisq() can't be right. I've run simulations with completely scrambled data (i.e., there should be no significant difference between the two models, because neither model successfully predicts the response), and the reported p-value is consistently "0". Are you sure it's not just pchisq() in this case? –  Atticus29 Dec 19 '12 at 20:47
    
I am quite sure that 1-pchisq(3.84,1) returns 0.05. You need to make sure you are putting the absolute value of the correct deviance difference in the first argument and the correct degrees of freedom in the second. The order of the model arguments will flip the sign of the anova $Deviance results but the abs() should take care of that. –  BondedDust Dec 19 '12 at 21:23
    
Point taken. Absolute values are there. Hmm... ok I just specifically designated the second argument as "df=model$DF[2]", and that cleared it up. Interesting... –  Atticus29 Dec 19 '12 at 22:03
    
I stand corrected... still not working. –  Atticus29 Dec 20 '12 at 3:48
show 1 more comment

If your 2 models are nested, then you can use the change in deviance of the 2 models to see if the model containing extra parameters yields an improved fit. If model 1 contains k parameters and model 2 contains those same k parameters plus an additional m parameters, then the change in deviance follows an (approximately) chi-square distribution with m degrees of freedom. You can use this test statistic to see if model 2 is an improvement on model 1.

If you are new to this area, I would strongly recommend reading an introductory text on GLMs

share|improve this answer
    
that's perfect, except I'm not quite sure how to actually implement that. I.e., do you happen to know the R syntax for it? –  Atticus29 Nov 5 '12 at 18:23
    
Unfortunately it is years since I used R. As far as I recall, the glm.summary output used to provide everything that was needed for this calculation. Hopefully you will get an R specific answer rather than just theoretical. –  mathematician1975 Nov 5 '12 at 18:27
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