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I need a way to find out how long one datetime.time is after another datetime.time Quite simple, but... the problem is that my time values are in 24 hour time so it's not as simple as negating one value from another. Instead i need to work out how long time_b is after time_a if I were to count forward in time and at midnight time loops round, i.e.

time_a = 09:00
time_b = 04:00

Here time_b is 19 hours after time_a

def time_after_time(time_a, time_b):

    a_hour = time_a.hour
    a_minute = time_a.minute
    b_hour = time_b.hour
    b_minute = time_b.minute

    out_hour = b_hour - a_hour
    out_minute = b_minute - a_minute

    if out_hour < 0:
        out_hour += 24

    if out_minute < 0:
        out_hour -= 1
        out_minute += 60

    return datetime.time(out_hour, out_minute)

This was my first try but its giving false results.

Can anyone think of a cleaner/correct way to do this?

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2  
Why not use datetime.timedelta? time_b - time_a will produce a timedelta. –  Martijn Pieters Nov 5 '12 at 18:13
    
this works for datetime.datetime objects but not datetime.time objects unfortunatley –  jonathan topf Nov 5 '12 at 18:15
    
@MartijnPieters it looks like the assumption is the time is for the same date... So, not quite sure what answer is expected... –  Jon Clements Nov 5 '12 at 18:16
    
is 09:00 - 10:00 = 1 hour or is it 25 hours? is the max 24 hours then? –  Joran Beasley Nov 5 '12 at 18:22
    
so if a = 09:00 and b = 10:00 then b is 1 hour after a but a is 23 hours after b, if that makes sense –  jonathan topf Nov 5 '12 at 18:27

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here is my solution:

def time_after_time(time_a, time_b):
    time_a_min = time_a.hour * 60 + time_a.minute
    time_b_min = time_b.hour * 60 + time_b.minute
    out_min = time_b_min - time_a_min
    if out_min < 0:
        out_min += 24 * 60
    return datetime.time(out_min / 60, out_min % 60)

You can test it on codepad.org.

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+1 for being concise –  jonathan topf Nov 5 '12 at 19:36
timedif = DATETIME_1 - DATETIME_2
print timedif

make sure you use datetime.datetime times ...

you can convert datetime.time to datetime with

datetime.datetime.combine(datetime.datetime.now().date(),datetimeTime_obj)

is 09:00 - 10:00 = 1 hour or is it 25 hours? is the max 24 hours then?

import datetime

time_a = datetime.time(9,00)
time_b = datetime.time(5,0)
dte = datetime.datetime.now().date()

dt_a = datetime.datetime.combine(dte,time_a)

dt_b = datetime.datetime.combine(dte,time_b)
time_dif = dt_b - dt_a
time_dif2 = dt_a - dt_b
print "TimeDif:",time_dif,time_dif2
#output: 20:00:00 , 04:00:00
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In my experience, it is essential that whenever you receive a 24-hour-based time-stamp from an external source, you should immediately convert it internally to an absolute time, such as seconds from 1970. See, for example in C, http://stackoverflow.com/a/12859648/318716 for a way to do this.

Once you do this, then simple subtraction of times becomes easy and valid.

If you don't do this, then problems with timestamps differing by 48 hours will eventually arise.

Such a conversion sometimes should not be based on the current date/time if, for example, you were doing an analysis of historical archived data, or a playback.

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his time differences should never be more than 23:59 hours ... according to his problem statement –  Joran Beasley Nov 5 '12 at 18:40
    
@JoranBeasley: Maybe I'm blind, but I can't see this in the problem statement. And if it were so, then this wouldn't be a real-world problem. But, unfortunately, I've also seen many incorrect 'real-world' solutions. And this has no impact on my suggested solution. –  Joseph Quinsey Nov 5 '12 at 18:48
    
the times should indeed never be more that 23.59 appart but it it true that I didn't explicitly state this –  jonathan topf Nov 5 '12 at 18:51

Second answer (which I don't advise, for reasons given in my first answer). In C you could have:

int time1MinusTime2Positive(int t1, int t2) { // returns dt from 0 to <24 hours
    return fmod(t1 - t2 + 100 * 24 * 60 * 60, 24 * 60 * 60);
}

int time1MinusTime2(int t1, int t2) { // returns dt between -12 and +12 hours
    const int dt = t1 - t2;
    if (dt > 24 * 60 * 60 / 2)
       return dt - 24 * 60 * 60;
    else if (dt < -24 * 60 * 60 / 2)
       return dt + 24 * 60 * 60;
    else
       return dt;
}

Here the input times are expressed as seconds from midnight, or seconds from 1970, or from 1900--it doesn't matter. Outputs are in seconds, relative to the 'current' midnight, whatever 'current' might mean.

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