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dput(df)
structure(list(Process = c("PROC050D", "PROC051D", "PROC100D", 
"PROC103D", "PROC104D", "PROC106D", "PROC106D", "PROC110D", "PROC111D", 
"PROC112D", "PROC113D", "PROC114D", "PROC130D", "PROC131D", "PROC132D", 
"PROC154D", "PROC155D", "PROC156D", "PROC157D", "PROC158D", "PROC159D", 
"PROC160D", "PROC161D", "PROC162D", "PROC163D", "PROC164D", "PROC165D", 
"PROC166D", "PROC170D", "PROC171D", "PROC173D", "PROC174D", "PROC177D", 
"PROC180D", "PROC181D", "PROC182D", "PROC185D", "PROC186D", "PROC187D", 
"PROC190D", "PROC191D", "PROC192D", "PROC196D", "PROC197D", "PROC201D", 
"PROC202D", "PROC203D", "PROC204D", "PROC205D", "PROC206D"), 
    Date = structure(c(15393, 15393, 15393, 15393, 15393, 15393, 
    15393, 15393, 15393, 15393, 15393, 15393, 15393, 15393, 15393, 
    15393, 15393, 15393, 15393, 15393, 15393, 15393, 15393, 15393, 
    15393, 15393, 15393, 15393, 15393, 15393, 15393, 15393, 15393, 
    15393, 15393, 15393, 15393, 15393, 15393, 15393, 15393, 15393, 
    15393, 15393, 15393, 15393, 15393, 15393, 15393, 15393), class = "Date"), 
    Duration = c(30L, 78L, 20L, 15L, 129L, 56L, 156L, 10L, 1656L, 
    1530L, 52L, 9L, 10L, 38L, 48L, 9L, 26L, 90L, 15L, 23L, 13L, 
    9L, 34L, 12L, 11L, 16L, 24L, 11L, 236L, 104L, 9L, 139L, 11L, 
    10L, 22L, 11L, 55L, 35L, 12L, 635L, 44L, 337L, 44L, 9L, 231L, 
    32L, 19L, 170L, 22L, 19L)), .Names = c("Process", "Date", 
"Duration"), row.names = c(NA, 50L), class = "data.frame")

I'm trying to capture outliers from my data using IQR method. But when I use this data, I also capture the data that maybe normal. I like to remove the seasonality from my data points and then apply the outlier rules.

There are thousands of different processes on the Process column. I just need to capture the processes' duration that is not normal. Any ideas how to remove the seasonality from my data set? The code below calculates outliers but the outliers may be normal due to seasonality factor. Before calculating the outliers, I like to remove the seasonality from my data frame.

library(data.table)

df<-df[, seventyFifth := quantile(Duration, .75), by = Process]
df<-df[, twentyFifth := quantile(Duration, .25), by = Process]
df<-df[, IQR := (seventyFifth-twentyFifth), by = Process]

df$diff<-df$Duration-df$seventyFifth

df<-df[, outlier := diff > 3 * IQR, by = Process]
share|improve this question
    
@GSee, no. I updated the post. I would like to remove or massage the data so that seasonality does not show up on my outlier calculations. I need to capture the outliers from my data set not including seasonal data points. –  user1471980 Nov 5 '12 at 19:21

2 Answers 2

To address a possible seasonal pattern, I would first use acf(df$Duration) to look for autocorrelation at different lags. If I didn't see anything, I probably wouldn't worry about it unless I had an a priori reason to model it. Your sample data show no evidence of seasonality, since --other than autocorrelation which is always 1-- the only correlation is at lag 1 and is modest:

enter image description here

An approach that can handle not only seasonal components (cyclically reoccurring events) but also trends (slow shifts in the norm) admirably is stl(), specifically as implemented in this posting by Rob J Hyndman.

The decomp function Hyndman gives there (reproduced below) is very helpful for checking for seasonality and then decomposing a time series into seasonal (if one exists), trend, and residual components.

decomp <- function(x,transform=TRUE)
{
  #decomposes time series into seasonal and trend components
  #from http://robjhyndman.com/researchtips/tscharacteristics/
  require(forecast)
  # Transform series
  if(transform & min(x,na.rm=TRUE) >= 0)
  {
    lambda <- BoxCox.lambda(na.contiguous(x))
    x <- BoxCox(x,lambda)
  }
  else
  {
    lambda <- NULL
    transform <- FALSE
  }
  # Seasonal data
  if(frequency(x)>1)
  {
    x.stl <- stl(x,s.window="periodic",na.action=na.contiguous)
    trend <- x.stl$time.series[,2]
    season <- x.stl$time.series[,1]
    remainder <- x - trend - season
  }
  else #Nonseasonal data
  {
    require(mgcv)
    tt <- 1:length(x)
    trend <- rep(NA,length(x))
    trend[!is.na(x)] <- fitted(gam(x ~ s(tt)))
    season <- NULL
    remainder <- x - trend
  }
  return(list(x=x,trend=trend,season=season,remainder=remainder,
    transform=transform,lambda=lambda))
}

As you can see it uses stl() (which uses loess) if there is seasonality and penal­ized regres­sion splines if there is no seasonality.

In your case you might use the function this way:

# makemodel
df.decomp <- decomp(df$Duration)

# add results into df
if (!is.null(df.decomp$season)){
    df$season <- df.decomp$season} else 
    {df$season < - 0}
df$trend <- df.decomp$trend
df$Durationsmoothed <- df.decomp$remainder

# if you don't want to detrend
df$Durationsmoothed <- df$Durationsmoothed+df$trend

You should consult the referenced blog post because it further develops this analysis.

share|improve this answer

It depends on how predictable or smooth the seasonality is. Is it something where you can make a loose model of it? For example,

LM <- lm(duration~sin(Date)+cos(Date))

Or some variation. Then you can analyze data only as far as they differ from the predicted seasonality:

P <- predict(LM)
DIF <- P-df$duration

Then you could use IQR on dif. And speaking of dif, you may get some helpful information by sorting the data by Date and using diff.

df <- df[order(df$Date),]
DIF2 <- diff(df$Date)
plot(diff(df$Date))

Theoretically, DIF2 should be the derivative of the function produced in LM.

As a side note, if there is one, I would not recommend taking a very systematic approach (i.e., loading a package and doing BlindlyGetRidOfOultliersAdjustingForSeasonality(df) if the seasonality is indeed complex.

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