Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

If I have an interface MyInterface1

interface MyInterface1
{
    ImyGod myproperty { get; set; }
}

If I have a class do the following, it complains

class myClass : IMyInterface1
{
    myGod myproperty { get; set; }
}

What should I iniatiate myClass with myGod here? Thanks.

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by code4life, McGarnagle, Matthew Ferreira, dove, Graviton Nov 7 '12 at 7:23

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Where are you seeing this ? –  Micah Armantrout Nov 5 '12 at 19:24
2  
Just read the compiler error message. –  Hans Passant Nov 5 '12 at 19:26
    
Please try to format your code samples readably. –  millimoose Nov 5 '12 at 19:29
    
I vote to close this question. Feels a lot like a troll-question. –  code4life Nov 5 '12 at 19:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

That's just not possible. In order to implement an interface the signature of the member must be exactly the same as the signature defined in the interface. You will either need to change the interface or the class's implementation so that the type of the property matches, exactly.

Since your property has a setter it means that, according to the interface, you would be able to set any object that implements ImyGod to that property, but since the derived class is typed to myGod instead, it can't support any other implementation of ImyGod.

What you could do is use a generic interface, like so:

interface MyInterface1<T> where T : ImyGod
{
    T myproperty { get; set; }
}

class myClass : IMyInterface1<myGod>
{
    myGod myproperty { get; set; }
}

That will compile and work as intended, and also prevent someone setting a someOtherGod instance to that property which it clearly can't support.

share|improve this answer
    
That is what I thought. Thanks. –  NewDTinStackoverflow Nov 5 '12 at 19:29

You should declare the property as public:

class myClass : IMyInterface1 
{ 
    public ImyGod myproperty {get; set;} 
}
share|improve this answer
2  
No, I need to use myGod instead of ImyGod in myClass –  NewDTinStackoverflow Nov 5 '12 at 19:26
    
@NewDTinStackoverflow if you knew the answer, why ask? –  McGarnagle Nov 5 '12 at 19:28
    
@NewDTinStackoverflow: then change your interface to myGod, not ImyGod. it's simple as that. –  code4life Nov 5 '12 at 19:29
    
@NewDTinStackoverflow You should really work on formatting your code better, and using more standard naming conventions, as it will make issues like that somewhat more apparent. –  Servy Nov 5 '12 at 19:29
    
@NewDTinStackoverflow: you must use ImyGod to meet interface requirement. If you want to have property of type myGod just add second property and implement appropriate logic in getter and setter. –  empi Nov 5 '12 at 19:29

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.