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the Form.ShowDialog() method causes the code to be halted until the newly called form is closed. I need the code to continue running after the ShowDialog() method is called. I googled and read about using backgroundworker? But that is the first time i have heard of that and never used it before.

Form2 form2this = new Form2();
form2this.ShowDialog();
MessageBox.Show("Something");

This code gets executed after clicking a button, how can i still call ShowDialog to prevent the user from interacting with the main form but still allowing the main form to continue with its work?

Sorry if its been discussed but everything i found seems extremely difficult to perform such a simple task. I am actually surprised its not included in the SHowDialog method. for instance ShowDialog().Continue would be cool.

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1  
What kinds of things do you want to do while the child form is shown? Are you changing the parent form, interacting with the child form, doing a non-UI task? –  Servy Nov 5 '12 at 19:57
    
Parentform.Enabled = false ? –  Brad Nov 5 '12 at 20:01

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted
  • If you just want the code to continue on instead of blocking until the popup is closed consider using Show instead of ShowDialog.

  • If you have some action that you want to have the parent form doing while the child form is up, then yes, it could be appropriate to use a BackgroundWorker (or just manually starting a new Thread/Task). It would be helpful to know more about what that task is though. If you need to interact with the main form, or the child form, then that seems like trouble to me; if you just need to do some background task with no UI interaction then this is the right line of thought.

  • Another possibility is that what you want to do really just should be something done in the child form, rather than the parent form.

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1  
Thank you. The reason i cannot use Show instead of ShowDialog is because i do not want the user to be able to interact with the parentForm. I could however possibly incorporate the parentForm.Enabled = false option while using the Show method. Then once the show method gets called and the child form is displayed, once closing, it will re enable the parent form. I am calling a second form which has a timer built into it to auto close when the timer is up. The second form is pretty much just a form with labels on it instructing to be patient as the parent form is doing some time exstensive –  Seth Nov 5 '12 at 21:46
    
tasks. As interacting with the parent form will cause errors in the task being executed. –  Seth Nov 5 '12 at 21:48
    
@Seth Just be careful that you implement the solution that is appropriate for the actual task that you have, rather than hacking together a solution designed to support a different scenario. Based on your edit, that appears to be the case here. Since you're really performing a background task, and don't need to actually interact with the UI while that's happening, you should start a BackgroundWorker or Task to do the long running task, then after starting it show the dialog form using ShowDialog. –  Servy Nov 5 '12 at 21:51
1  
thank you so much for your answer and your general knowledge and wanting me to do something proper. I really appreciate the fact you want me to learn the right way. That does make a lot of sense using the BackgroundWorker or Task. But i have never used them before in that manor. I did actually use Brad 's method of ParentForm.Enabled = false after calling Show. Then i used an event handler to wait for the child form to close, then once it does close, i re-enable the parent form. And it actually blends quite smoothly by making the parent form greyed out. I thank all of you very much –  Seth Nov 5 '12 at 22:24
    
And i apologize for my lack of experience, i am only self taught and learn from YouTube/Web and dont do programming day to day. So i really appreciate the cooperativeness from all of you and thanks again @Brad for the idea! Best wishes, Seth –  Seth Nov 5 '12 at 22:25

Is there any reason why you can't have this code as part of the Form2 class? Or use a non-modal dialog? You could use a background worker or even something simple like a timer, but seems like overkill?

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Run an async call to show modal. Here an example in wpf:

private Window waitView;

/// <summary>
/// Closes a displayed WaitView from code.
/// </summary>
public void CloseWaitView()
{
  if(waitView != null)
  {
     // Work on the gui Thread of waitView.
     waitView.Dispatcher.Invoke(new Action(() => close()));
  }
}

/// <summary>
/// Closes a displayed WaitView and releases waitView-Instance.
/// </summary>    
private void close()
{
   waitView.Close();
   waitView = null;
}   

/// <summary>
/// Showes a modal WaitView (Window).
/// </summary>
public void ShowWaitView()
{
  // instance a new WaitViewWindow --> your Window extends Window-Class
  waitView = new WaitViewWindow();

  // prepare a operation to call it async --> your ShowDialog-call
  var asyncCall = new Action(() => waitView.Dispatcher.Invoke(
                                   new Action(() => waitView.ShowDialog())
                             ));

  // call the operation async

  // Argument 1 ar:
  // ar means IAsyncResult (what should be done, when come back from ShowDialog -->     
  // remove view memory with set waitView to null or ... dispose

  // the second argument is an custom parameter you can set to use in ar.AsyncState
  asyncCall.BeginInvoke(ar => waitView = null, null);

  // all from here is done during ShowDialog ...
}
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This is my way, so ugly but i have no better idea.

private void AppUiMain_Shown(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    var loading = new AppUiLoading();
    loading.Shown += (o, args) =>
    {
        bool isLoading = true;
        loading.Top = (int)(loading.Top * 1.16);

        Application.DoEvents();//refresh ui

        EventHandler ehr = null;
        EventHandler ehe = null;
        ehr = (ss, ee) =>
        {
            App.Instance.Ready -= ehr;
            App.Instance.Error -= ehe;
            isLoading = false;
        };
        ehe = (ss, ee) =>
        {
            loading.Text = "Error";
            loading.ShowAbortButton("Error occur");
        };
        App.Instance.Error += ehe;
        App.Instance.Ready += ehr;
        InitApp();

        //HACK: find a better way to `refresh' main form
        Application.DoEvents();
        this.Height++;
        this.Height--;

        //HACK: find a better way to keep message looping on ShowDialog
        while (isLoading)
            Application.DoEvents();

        loading.Close();
    };
    loading.ShowDialog(this);
}
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To continue code execution without closing modal dialog WindowsFormsSynchronizationContext.Current.Post(-=> {"Your code"}, null); can be used. Here you can find more detail -

http://newapputil.blogspot.in/2015/05/continue-executing-code-after-calling.html

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I suppose next solution for async ShowDialog:

public bool DialogResultAsync
{
    get;
    private set;
}

public async Task<bool> ShowDialogAsync()
{
    var cts = new CancellationTokenSource();
    // Attach token cancellation on form closing.
    Closed += (object sender, EventArgs e) =>
    {
        cts.Cancel();
    };
    Show(); // Show message without GUI freezing.
    try
    {
        // await for user button click.
        await Task.Delay(Timeout.Infinite, cts.Token);
    }
    catch (TaskCanceledException)
    { } 
}

public void ButtonOkClick()
{
    DialogResultAsync = true;
    Close();
}

public void ButtonCancelClick()
{
    DialogResultAsync = false;
    Close();
}

And in main form you must use this code:

public async void ShowDialogAsyncSample()
{
    var msg = new Message();
    if (await msg.ShowDialogAsync())
    {
        // Now you can use DialogResultAsync as you need.
        System.Diagnostics.Debug.Write(msg.DialogResultAsync);
    }
}
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