Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am VERY new to c++ and I still haven't wrapped my head around the basic concepts yet but my professor wants us to write an algorithm to shuffle and display a deck of cards and the deck needs to be represented as a 2d array.

However I am having trouble just simulating the deck of cards!

  #include <iostream>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

int main() {
    vector<char> deck;
    char suit[] = {'h','d','c','s'};
    char card[] = {'2','3','4','5','6','7','8','9','T','J','Q','K','A'};
    for (int j=0; j<13; j++) {
        for (int i=0; i<4; i++) {
            deck.push_back(card[j] suit[i]);
        }       
    }

    return 0;
}

I've seen a lot of card programs with classes but I'm not even sure if we are going to learn those this semester.

share|improve this question
1  
You can combine the suit and value into a structure. –  chris Nov 5 '12 at 19:55
1  
deck.push_back(card[j] suit[i]); - what char do you expect card[j] suit[i] to be? –  Luchian Grigore Nov 5 '12 at 19:55
1  
For shuffling, I would recommend std::random_shuffle, but that defeats the point. Keep that in mind, though, instead of making your own when you need to trivially shuffle something. –  chris Nov 5 '12 at 20:03
    
Are you sure that "the deck needs to be represented as a 2d array" is a requirement? It sounds like a really unusable way to represent a deck of cards (which is one-dimensional by nature). –  molbdnilo Nov 5 '12 at 20:52
add comment

4 Answers

Using a simple struct, you could edit your code like this:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

struct Card {
  char suit, number;
  Card(char aSuit, char aNumber) : suit(aSuit), number(aNumber) { }
};

int main() {
    vector<Card> deck;
    char suit[] = {'h','d','c','s'};
    char num[] = {'2','3','4','5','6','7','8','9','T','J','Q','K','A'};
    for (int j=0; j<13; j++) {   
        for (int i=0; i<4; i++) {
            deck.push_back(Card(suit[i], num[j]);
        }
    }

    // now, deck[0] to deck[51] hold all the cards
    // first card's suit is deck[0].suit, number is deck[0].number

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

As suggested in the comments, you should use a struct to represent a card. See for instance this article

For the shuffling algorithm, here is a hint : if you can shuffle a deck of n-1 card can you shuffle a deck of n cards ?

share|improve this answer
    
We know that you can shuffle a deck of n cards. Therefore it is possible to shuffle (by your argument) n-1 cards. But this argument falls down because you cannot shuffle one card. –  Ed Heal Nov 5 '12 at 20:44
    
You can too shuffle one card. It's the identity transformation. Just because it doesn't feel like shuffle doesn't make it the wrong definition. –  eh9 Nov 5 '12 at 20:53
    
Indeed, and the algorithm I thought about has been mentionned in the comment by bames53 provided in an other answer. –  Vincent Nivoliers Nov 5 '12 at 21:15
add comment

Why make it complicated?

A pack of cards contain 52 elements. Each element can be denoted by two characters. As mentioned in your post the suit and the (for want of a better word) number. Construct that array. You do not need the expense of vectors etc. The size of the array is fixed. 52 items, each item 2 characters.

Then have a loop - run that look as many times as you wish.

Each time around the loop chose two items between 0-51 (remember in C++ world things start at zero). Those two numbers are random (see rand). Swap them (both characters - or preferably use a struct).

share|improve this answer
1  
Using this algorithm for shuffling, it is not possible to guarantee that every permutation has the same probability. The result will actually strongly depend on the initial order of the cards in the deck. –  Vincent Nivoliers Nov 5 '12 at 20:06
    
@VincentNivoliers - I would be interest in seeing this mathematical proof of this statement. –  Ed Heal Nov 5 '12 at 20:30
    
My calculator says there are 8x10^67 possibilities. So why not generate all those an pick one. If you shuffle a pack of cards and I do likewise (despite the initial order) it will very next to impossible for your set of cards to be in the same order as mine. –  Ed Heal Nov 5 '12 at 20:37
    
A more typical shuffle algorithm is to iterate through the list once, at each iteration swap a random element from the beginning 'unshuffled' portion of the list with last element of the unshuffled portion and then decrease the unshuffled portion by one (so the shuffled portion grows at the end). This is the modern version of the Fisher-Yates shuffle. –  bames53 Nov 5 '12 at 20:43
2  
No amount of random pair swaps ever yields the same probability distribution as a random permutation, because 52! does not divide 52^N for any value of N. As N gets large, the probabilities do converge, admittedly. –  eh9 Nov 5 '12 at 20:58
show 4 more comments

Go read Jon Bentley's Programming Pearls. In the first chapter there's an algorithm for generating random permutations. The algorithm generates each permutation with equal likelihood, and what's more, by the end of reading it, you'll understand why.

His algorithm uses a single index for the permutation. In your case, use N=52 and generate your two indices by the (integer) quotient and remainder after dividing by 4. The quotient gives you a card index; the remainder gives you a suit.

share|improve this answer
    
(is that Edinburgh?) - Have you seen Darren Brown (youtube.com/watch?v=GTEhOLDa7nQ). Nearly beat it. Also computers only do an approximation of random. –  Ed Heal Nov 5 '12 at 20:42
    
@EdHeal Please go read up on pseudorandom sequences and their cryptographic versions to understand why "perfect randomness" for this question is a red herring. –  eh9 Nov 5 '12 at 20:55
    
One little question - can a computer (that is deterministic) produce a random number? It cannot. It is deterministic. –  Ed Heal Nov 5 '12 at 20:59
    
@EdHeal but you can read 'randomness' from an external source and use that in an algorithm. –  bames53 Nov 5 '12 at 21:07
    
@bames53 - We are entering the field of Philosophy. Is anything random? Does God play dice? –  Ed Heal Nov 5 '12 at 21:15
show 5 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.