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I need to use a nested for loop to get a list of prime numbers, here is the code:

public static void main(String[] args) {

        for (int i = 2; i <= 10; i++)
        {
            for (int d = 3; d <= 10; d = d + 2)
            {
                 int result = d % i;
                 System.out.println(result);

            }
        }
    }

I think I have the logic right here, but the results was a bit out of mind, any suggestions please ?

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closed as too localized by dmckee, brimborium, Andy Hayden, Chris Lätta, Graviton Nov 6 '12 at 2:16

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2  
You are just printing the result of all the modulus operation, and not checking the condition required for prime numbers. What do you expect as output? –  Rohit Jain Nov 5 '12 at 20:17
    
I want to print a list just like: 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 –  Twocode Nov 5 '12 at 20:20
    
9 is not a prime number...3 * 3 = 9, right? –  dmckee Nov 5 '12 at 20:26
    
However, reading the comments I see that this has degenerated into a "please write my code for me" situation. Voting to close. –  dmckee Nov 5 '12 at 20:26
    
@dmckee you are right, I need to check if its a prime number. –  Twocode Nov 5 '12 at 20:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What you are doing is only a bit related to finding out prime numbers in that, you are using modulus operator, that is needed, but nothing more than that.

You actually need to make use of the result of that operation.

You can follow the following pseudo-code: -

for i = 2 to 10 {

    1. set a boolean flag for prime to false;

    2. for j = 2 to (i - 1) {  // Since we just need to check modulus till that number
        1. check the result of `i % j`
        2. If any of the result in this loop is `0`, then `i` is not a prime number. 
           So, set the `prime` flag to false, and break out of loop, 
    }
    3. check the value of `prime` flag. If it is `true`, print number is `prime`. 
       Else print not prime 
}

I am not giving away the code, since it would be beneficial for you to try it out on your own. You will learn how to implement a problem statement given in the form of algorithmic steps.

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Thanks for the pseudo-code, I know what's wrong here now –  Twocode Nov 5 '12 at 20:35
    
@Twocold.. Nice to see that you liked the pseudo-code, rather than complete code posted above. Now you can implement it to get what you want. :) –  Rohit Jain Nov 5 '12 at 20:36

Run it like this, you will understand:

for (int i = 2; i <= 10; i++)
    {
        for (int d = 3; d <= 10; d = d + 2)
            {
                int result = d % i;
                System.out.println("i="+i+" d:"+d+" result:"+result);

            }
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
the format is good, but not the results I was looking for, thanks anyway. I need it output something like: 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 –  Twocode Nov 5 '12 at 20:24
4  
@Twocold He's trying to show you how to debug your own code, by looking at the print outs, you should be able to see what you are doing wrong. He's not just doing your homework for you. –  16dots Nov 5 '12 at 20:27

Here is the Java code (algorithm uses the Sieve of Eratosthenes):

public static void main(String[] args) { 
    int N = Integer.parseInt(args[0]);

    // initially assume all integers are prime
    boolean[] isPrime = new boolean[N + 1];
    for (int i = 2; i <= N; i++) {
        isPrime[i] = true;
    }

    // mark non-primes <= N using Sieve of Eratosthenes
    for (int i = 2; i*i <= N; i++) {

        // if i is prime, then mark multiples of i as nonprime
        // suffices to consider mutiples i, i+1, ..., N/i
        if (isPrime[i]) {
            for (int j = i; i*j <= N; j++) {
                isPrime[i*j] = false;
            }
        }
    }

    // count primes
    int primes = 0;
    for (int i = 2; i <= N; i++) {
        if (isPrime[i]) primes++;
    }
    System.out.println("The number of primes <= " + N + " is " + primes);
}

Above sample code is from this site.

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Looks almost lika a copy of my own code ;) to speed it up (just a little) replace your marking for-loop to this: for (int j = i + i; j <= N; j += i) { isPrime[j] = false; } –  jlordo Nov 5 '12 at 20:33
1  
There are already too much answers to this questions and it doesn't look any of it is going to be accepted ;) edit: I was wrong :) –  vale4674 Nov 5 '12 at 21:06
    
I have tested your code, but it throws me a java.lang.ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException –  Twocode Nov 5 '12 at 21:19
    
Try setting N to 10 or whatever number you want. –  vale4674 Nov 5 '12 at 22:00

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