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Possible Duplicate:
reincluding header in implementation

What I am wondering is that it is common practice to not use using namespace xxx in a header file as not to pollute the global namespace. How does this go for #includes?

If I have foo.h and foo.cpp.:

//Foo.h
#ifndef FOO_H_
#define FOO_H_

#include <string>

class Foo
{
  public:
    Foo(std::string * a, std::string * b);
    virtual ~Foo();
};

#endif /* FOO_H_ */

//Foo.cpp
#include <string>
#include <Foo.h>
Foo::Foo(std::string * a, std::string * b)
{
  // TODO Auto-generated constructor stub

}

Foo::~Foo()
{
  // TODO Auto-generated destructor stub
}

Would I really need to #include <string> in both files? Would including it only in the .h or .cpp suffice? (I know both will work, but what is advisable?)


edit, a bit more background information regarding my question.
If I would be using certain classes in my header file (either as variables or method arguments) I would forward declare them in the header file and only include the header file itself in the source file. But this will not work for most STL libs because you can't forward declare class-templates?

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marked as duplicate by Bo Persson, Kjuly, Andy Hayden, Brian Mains, bensiu Nov 6 '12 at 1:22

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

5  
You only need to include it in the header, but it's good to include each thing you need in every file you need it. – chris Nov 5 '12 at 20:50
    
@chris see my edit – Daan Timmer Nov 5 '12 at 20:53
5  
Forward declare when possible, #include when necessary. It can help to greatly reduce your build times. – Chad Nov 5 '12 at 20:55
2  
Include them. The only alternative is forward declaration, and you surely don't want to forward declare namespace std { template <typename, typename, typename> class basic_string; typedef basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > string; }. (I'm not even sure whether this is correct) – Alexandre C. Nov 5 '12 at 20:57
1  
@AlexandreC.: I'm pretty sure that such a forward declaration would technically be undefined behavior. C++03 §17.4.3.1/1 says "It is undefined for a C++ program to add declarations or definitions to namespace std or namespaces within namespace std unless otherwise specified." – Adam Rosenfield Nov 5 '12 at 21:37
up vote 2 down vote accepted

... because you can't forward declare class-templates?

class templates can be forward declared - like non template classes:

// forward declaration
template <typename T>
class C;

However, as @AlexandreC stated in comments, for std::string it would be quite complicated, because std::string is typedef from template <typename,typename,typename> basic_string;.

I write it would be complicated, if it would be allowed. And it is not allowed, see:

According to the C++11 standard, 17.6.4.2.1:

The behavior of a C++ program is undefined if it adds declarations or definitions to namespace std or to a namespace within namespace std unless otherwise specified.

So, no choice but include <string> in header file for std::string.


For your main question - I would include in source and header files, unless I was pretty sure it would be always included in header file and never removed...

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I'm not sure that forward declaring anything from the std namespace is even allowed. – Alexandre C. Nov 5 '12 at 21:33
    
@AlexandreC. I forward declare things from std namespace from time to time - never thinks if it is allowed. Well, maybe it is good point to start thinking about it... – PiotrNycz Nov 5 '12 at 21:35
3  
I'm pretty sure that forward declaring anything in namespace std is technically be undefined behavior. C++03 §17.4.3.1/1 says "It is undefined for a C++ program to add declarations or definitions to namespace std or namespaces within namespace std unless otherwise specified." – Adam Rosenfield Nov 5 '12 at 21:40
    
@AdamRosenfield you are right. – PiotrNycz Nov 5 '12 at 21:41
    
I am not sure the quote stands in it's own right. You are not technically adding anything to the namespace, you are only instructing the compiler that it is there and will be there after the proper inclusion. On the other hand, in the case of templates, the standard allows the implementation to add any number of template arguments are long as there are defaults, and that makes it impossible to forward declare templates in a portable way. – David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 5 '12 at 22:40

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